• How to use up tough Spanish ham?

    I bought a whole paleta for a party, but it turned out to be very tough, although it tastes fine. There's at least half of it left on the bone, so how best to use it up? I chopped some up small and added it to a Spanish-style stew of pork and lentils, and the flavour was excellent but the little bits of jamon were quite leathery aft 30 minutes... show more
    I bought a whole paleta for a party, but it turned out to be very tough, although it tastes fine. There's at least half of it left on the bone, so how best to use it up? I chopped some up small and added it to a Spanish-style stew of pork and lentils, and the flavour was excellent but the little bits of jamon were quite leathery aft 30 minutes cooking. Anyone have any good ideas how to cook with jamon? For example, would very long slow cooking soften it, or just pull the remaining moisture out of it and leave it rock-hard?
    2 answers · Cooking & Recipes · 2 months ago
  • Could a sword made of welded shards really be useable?

    I know that medieval smiths certainly could weld together the shards of a broken sword, or even sections of different blades, But would the blade thus produced be of useable quality, or it would it always be likely to break along the joins? I'm asking mainly in respect of the two-hand sword in Scotland that is known (certainly incorrectly) as... show more
    I know that medieval smiths certainly could weld together the shards of a broken sword, or even sections of different blades, But would the blade thus produced be of useable quality, or it would it always be likely to break along the joins? I'm asking mainly in respect of the two-hand sword in Scotland that is known (certainly incorrectly) as 'the Sword of William Wallace'. The blade of that sword was created by hammer-welding three sections of different blades together. Would anyone ever have make a real weapon that way, or only a fake or ceremonial 'bearing' sword?
    8 answers · History · 2 years ago
  • When did it become expected in Britain that advent calendars would contain chocolates?

    Time was, there was just a seasonal picture behind the date, and opening the window each day was a way of building up anticipation for Christmas, not of getting a treat. Seeing the day s picture and knowing you were a day nearer to Christmas was supposed to be enough of a treat in itself. I don t want to know the *first time* anybody thought of... show more
    Time was, there was just a seasonal picture behind the date, and opening the window each day was a way of building up anticipation for Christmas, not of getting a treat. Seeing the day s picture and knowing you were a day nearer to Christmas was supposed to be enough of a treat in itself. I don t want to know the *first time* anybody thought of putting a sweet behind the window; I want to know when it became normal, so that a child would feel actively cheated if there weren t one.
    2 answers · Christmas · 2 years ago
  • Why put the Colourcatcher sheet to the back of the tumbledrier drum?

    All the makers of this kind of product tell you to put it in the back of the drum before putting in the wet laundry. Why? Wouldn't it work just as well if you put it in on top?
    All the makers of this kind of product tell you to put it in the back of the drum before putting in the wet laundry. Why? Wouldn't it work just as well if you put it in on top?
    2 answers · Maintenance & Repairs · 2 years ago
  • Why gut baby mackerel but not sardines?

    I was in Lisbon last week and at a little restaurant I ordered grilled baby mackerel and my husband had grilled sardines. Both were good, but I noticed that the mackerel had been gutted while the sardines has been left whole, even though they were four times the size of the mackerel. Any Portuguese cooks or grilled-fish mavens here who can tell me... show more
    I was in Lisbon last week and at a little restaurant I ordered grilled baby mackerel and my husband had grilled sardines. Both were good, but I noticed that the mackerel had been gutted while the sardines has been left whole, even though they were four times the size of the mackerel. Any Portuguese cooks or grilled-fish mavens here who can tell me why you would gut the one but not the other?
    4 answers · Other - Food & Drink · 2 years ago
  • Why do the New Zealand rugby team wear black?

    All I can find out is that they have been wearing black since at least 1905. Does anyone know why this colour was first chosen?
    All I can find out is that they have been wearing black since at least 1905. Does anyone know why this colour was first chosen?
    4 answers · Rugby · 2 years ago
  • What is stitched into the back of international rugby players' shirts?

    They all have a rectangular object between the shoulder blades. what is it?
    They all have a rectangular object between the shoulder blades. what is it?
    1 answer · Rugby · 2 years ago
  • What actually is the function of online check-in?

    Time was you booked a ticket, and when you turned up at the airport you checked in, so that the airline would know you were actually there and ready to fly. If you checked in but didn't get to the departure gate they could actually announce on the PA system 'Will Mr X please go to departure gate 2', and if you didn't check in by the... show more
    Time was you booked a ticket, and when you turned up at the airport you checked in, so that the airline would know you were actually there and ready to fly. If you checked in but didn't get to the departure gate they could actually announce on the PA system 'Will Mr X please go to departure gate 2', and if you didn't check in by the deadline time they knew you weren't there and they didn't have to bother with you. But now that most passengers (and in the case of cut-price airlines like Ryanair, all of them) have checked in online, often weeks ago, that purpose is lost. It's just an extra and time-consuming part of the booking procedure. I can see that if you book through a travel agent or 'find a flight' website you need to register your details with the airline itself. But if you're booking on the airline's own website, why not just do the whole thing in one go? What purpose does a separate checking-in process serve?
    8 answers · Air Travel · 3 years ago
  • Quince tree grown from seed?

    A friend gave me a quince seedling she had grown from a seed from a fruit bought at the greengrocer. I planted it in my garden (in SE England) and six years on it is a fine healthy young tree, but it has never flowered, let alone set any fruit. I will keep it anyway, as a keepsake from my friend, but I wonder if seedlings from a commercial quince... show more
    A friend gave me a quince seedling she had grown from a seed from a fruit bought at the greengrocer. I planted it in my garden (in SE England) and six years on it is a fine healthy young tree, but it has never flowered, let alone set any fruit. I will keep it anyway, as a keepsake from my friend, but I wonder if seedlings from a commercial quince fruit are always barren, or if there is anything I could do to encourage it to flower?
    1 answer · Garden & Landscape · 3 years ago
  • Why do some microwaves have a turntable and others not?

    When you see a microwave without one, is it because the manufacturers reckon they’ve made it to a high enough spec that it doesn’t have cold spots? – or because they don’t care if has cold spots and it’s cheaper not to include one?
    When you see a microwave without one, is it because the manufacturers reckon they’ve made it to a high enough spec that it doesn’t have cold spots? – or because they don’t care if has cold spots and it’s cheaper not to include one?
    1 answer · Physics · 3 years ago
  • How many calories could you save by sleeping with a hot water bottle in freezing conditions?

    The memoirs of a nurse in the Scottish Women's Hospitals - an all-female unit that served with the Serbian Army in WWII and took part in the terrible retreat through the Albanian mountains in the winter of 1915 - relates how every member of the unit had her rubber hot water bottle, and amazed and amused their Serbian comrades by always filling... show more
    The memoirs of a nurse in the Scottish Women's Hospitals - an all-female unit that served with the Serbian Army in WWII and took part in the terrible retreat through the Albanian mountains in the winter of 1915 - relates how every member of the unit had her rubber hot water bottle, and amazed and amused their Serbian comrades by always filling them at night before lying down in their blankets (there were no tents) , and even more by using the not-quite-cold water to wash every morning before starting the day's march. The macho Serbs thought this was quite bizarre and evidence of the well-known madness of the British people. But 200,000 Serbs died of cold, hunger and disease on that march, and none of the women of the SWH did. Obviously, cuddling a hot bottle would mean you would sleep better, and thus keep up your strength. Washing daily would protect you from infection, possibly not much given that I suspect it was only face and hands, maybe feet, but would certainly be good for morale. And, not having to expend energy keeping one's body from freezing all night would significantly conserve calories. But how *many* would it conserve? How many slices of bread a day, say, was each nurse better off for using her bottle? I realise the variables are far too many for a definitive answer, but can anybody give at least some idea?
    1 answer · Biology · 3 years ago
  • How big is a 'sprig' of herb?

    Here I have a recipe that asks for '4 sprigs of rosemary'. My rosemary bush has spikes of new growth 8 inches long; if I used 4 of those I suspect it would overpower the dish completely. I have this problem every time a recipe calls for 'sprigs' of anything. Is there any understood standard size for 'a sprig'?
    Here I have a recipe that asks for '4 sprigs of rosemary'. My rosemary bush has spikes of new growth 8 inches long; if I used 4 of those I suspect it would overpower the dish completely. I have this problem every time a recipe calls for 'sprigs' of anything. Is there any understood standard size for 'a sprig'?
    4 answers · Cooking & Recipes · 3 years ago
  • How would a German count and his family have been correctly addressed?

    I mean, a century or so ago when German nobility had both legal existence and social importance. If you were (a) the Kaiser, (b) a social equal, or (c) an underling, what would you have called them face to face? I know that a count's children would all be counts and countesses themselves, so were they addressed exactly as their parents, or... show more
    I mean, a century or so ago when German nobility had both legal existence and social importance. If you were (a) the Kaiser, (b) a social equal, or (c) an underling, what would you have called them face to face? I know that a count's children would all be counts and countesses themselves, so were they addressed exactly as their parents, or was a distinction made?
    3 answers · Royalty · 4 years ago
  • Ce boisson est infernal!?

    If a Frenchman is offered a drink that's new to him, and his verdict on trying it is 'Infernal!' does that mean 'it's terrible' or 'it's amazing'? I need to know whether a bottle of my home made sloe gin would be welcome next time I visit my French friends, or not!
    If a Frenchman is offered a drink that's new to him, and his verdict on trying it is 'Infernal!' does that mean 'it's terrible' or 'it's amazing'? I need to know whether a bottle of my home made sloe gin would be welcome next time I visit my French friends, or not!
    2 answers · Languages · 4 years ago
  • In his book 'The Princess Diana Conspiracy', why does Alan Power say that the Decree Absolute was...?

    ....'granted just thirty-six hours before she was murdered', when the news media worldwide reported the news of the granting of the decree absolute, and even showed pictures of the document itself, on 28 August 1996 - a year and three days before her death? (You can see the CNN news report of that day here:... show more
    ....'granted just thirty-six hours before she was murdered', when the news media worldwide reported the news of the granting of the decree absolute, and even showed pictures of the document itself, on 28 August 1996 - a year and three days before her death? (You can see the CNN news report of that day here: http://edition.cnn.com/WORLD/9608/28/roy... - Does he believe that the worldwide reporting of the grant of the decree absolute was an unfounded rumour? - Does he believe that the entire internet has been doctored subsequently to make it appear that the decree was granted a year earlier than it was? - Does he misunderstand British divorce proceedings, and somehow believe that a divorce only becomes absolute 12 months after the decree absolute? - Did he just misread his notes and make a silly mistake? - Whatever is the reason, why would anybody place any credence in a book that retails such easily-checkable misstatements?
    10 answers · Royalty · 4 years ago
  • Is there any equivalent to Golden Syrup in France?

    A French friend has asked me to send him my recipe for gingerbread, and I don't know if he will be able to buy any corn syrup equivalent to Tate & Lyle's Golden Syrup in downtown Toulouse, or if he'll need to use something quite different such as maple syrup or runny honey.
    A French friend has asked me to send him my recipe for gingerbread, and I don't know if he will be able to buy any corn syrup equivalent to Tate & Lyle's Golden Syrup in downtown Toulouse, or if he'll need to use something quite different such as maple syrup or runny honey.
    3 answers · Cooking & Recipes · 5 years ago
  • Does a 'master title deed' have any legal function?

    In Britain nobody needs to undergo any legal procedure to adopt a new title. If you want to use the title Doctor, Professor, Reverend, or whatever, you just do. Your title isn't part of your legal name anyway. Therefore, I can't see any legal function for a 'master title deed' designed to change your title. Does it in fact have any... show more
    In Britain nobody needs to undergo any legal procedure to adopt a new title. If you want to use the title Doctor, Professor, Reverend, or whatever, you just do. Your title isn't part of your legal name anyway. Therefore, I can't see any legal function for a 'master title deed' designed to change your title. Does it in fact have any real function or legal reality? Are there any circumstances in which it might be useful or necessary? Please note: I am *NOT* asking about the validity of any titles you might adopt with such a deed! I know this is used by scam merchants to sell people fake titles, and if you come on here just to tell me that I will mark your answer down. I just want to know if the mechanism they are using to do it has any real existence.
    1 answer · Law & Ethics · 5 years ago
  • When did glass-bottomed tankards come into use?

    It's my feeling that it was around the end of the 19th/beginning of the 20th century: am I right? And also am I right that that the point of the glass bottom was nothing to do with the 'King's shilling' but because with the change in beer styles from a dark brew to a brighter, clearer drink, people wanted to be able to see that... show more
    It's my feeling that it was around the end of the 19th/beginning of the 20th century: am I right? And also am I right that that the point of the glass bottom was nothing to do with the 'King's shilling' but because with the change in beer styles from a dark brew to a brighter, clearer drink, people wanted to be able to see that the beer was clear and not muddy? (A glass was ideal for this, but if glasses weren't practical (e.g. in rough pubs) a glass-bottomed tankard was next best.)
    2 answers · History · 5 years ago