• Placement of "indefinitely"?

    I am going to put the adverb, indefinitely, in three different positions of a sentence. (1) My contract will indefinitely be renewed. (2) My contract will be indefinitely renewed. (3) My contract will be renewed indefinitely. I have heard that it's grammatically correct to put an adverb as close to an adjective or a verb as possible. So, (2)... show more
    I am going to put the adverb, indefinitely, in three different positions of a sentence. (1) My contract will indefinitely be renewed. (2) My contract will be indefinitely renewed. (3) My contract will be renewed indefinitely. I have heard that it's grammatically correct to put an adverb as close to an adjective or a verb as possible. So, (2) and (3) are correct. I have also heard that you can split "will" "be" with an adverb. Do you think it's both grammatically correct and idiomatic to say (1)? Thanks for your opinion.
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 weeks ago
  • Interpreting "you can" and "you could"?

    I am going to write down two sentences below. (1) You are not trying as hard as you can. (2) You are not trying as hard as you could. How do the words "can" and "could" change the meaning of the sentence? Thanks.
    I am going to write down two sentences below. (1) You are not trying as hard as you can. (2) You are not trying as hard as you could. How do the words "can" and "could" change the meaning of the sentence? Thanks.
    2 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 weeks ago
  • Make something notable?

    I have seen the following sentence written somewhere. But, I don't remember exactly where I saw it. (ex) The popular author tried very hard to make a rare phrase notable. Does it make sense to say "make something notable"?
    I have seen the following sentence written somewhere. But, I don't remember exactly where I saw it. (ex) The popular author tried very hard to make a rare phrase notable. Does it make sense to say "make something notable"?
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 3 weeks ago
  • A "dramatic" guy?

    My nephew likes acting very much. He is in a few local acting clubs and participates in a lot of community plays. He will take acting courses at a college next year. Can I describe him as "dramatic"? If not, what is an apt word to describe how much he likes acting? Thanks.
    My nephew likes acting very much. He is in a few local acting clubs and participates in a lot of community plays. He will take acting courses at a college next year. Can I describe him as "dramatic"? If not, what is an apt word to describe how much he likes acting? Thanks.
    6 answers · Words & Wordplay · 3 weeks ago
  • Class starts ... vs The class starts ...?

    I have written down two sentences below. (A) Class starts in five days. (B) The class starts in five days. Sentence A has the definite article in it. How do the two sentences differ in meaning? Could someone explain the different meanings? Thanks.
    I have written down two sentences below. (A) Class starts in five days. (B) The class starts in five days. Sentence A has the definite article in it. How do the two sentences differ in meaning? Could someone explain the different meanings? Thanks.
    6 answers · Words & Wordplay · 4 weeks ago
  • Before two days ago, I + past perfect continuous.?

    I am going to make up an example below. (ex) Before two days ago, I had been looking for my lost watch for ten days. Yesterday, I gave up my search. Does it make sense to say "Before two days ago,.."?
    I am going to make up an example below. (ex) Before two days ago, I had been looking for my lost watch for ten days. Yesterday, I gave up my search. Does it make sense to say "Before two days ago,.."?
    1 answer · Singles & Dating · 1 month ago
  • Enrolled in (a) high school and enrolled in (a) private high school?

    I am often confused about when you need an article when you talk about schools. I am going to make up four similar examples. (1) You are enrolled in a high school. (2) You are enrolled in high school. (3) You are enrolled in a private high school. (4) You are enrolled in private high school. I think if you are talking about "high... show more
    I am often confused about when you need an article when you talk about schools. I am going to make up four similar examples. (1) You are enrolled in a high school. (2) You are enrolled in high school. (3) You are enrolled in a private high school. (4) You are enrolled in private high school. I think if you are talking about "high school", you don't need the article as in (2). If you are specific about a type of high school, you need the article as in (3). What is your opinion?
    1 answer · Primary & Secondary Education · 1 month ago
  • Does it make sense to say "feel rude"?

    Yesterday, I went to a computer workshop and watched someone demonstrate how to use a piece of software. He said something like: "If you have any questions, feel free to ask me. Please don't think interrupting me makes you feel rude." Is it correct to say "make someone feel rude"?
    Yesterday, I went to a computer workshop and watched someone demonstrate how to use a piece of software. He said something like: "If you have any questions, feel free to ask me. Please don't think interrupting me makes you feel rude." Is it correct to say "make someone feel rude"?
    10 answers · Words & Wordplay · 1 month ago
  • Correct sequence of words?

    I am going to make up two pairs of words. (1a) How many people are there in the house? (1b) How many people in the house are house? (2a) I bought a vase from John yesterday. (2b) I bought a vase yesterday from John. Is it grammatically correct to have these different orders of words? Thanks.
    I am going to make up two pairs of words. (1a) How many people are there in the house? (1b) How many people in the house are house? (2a) I bought a vase from John yesterday. (2b) I bought a vase yesterday from John. Is it grammatically correct to have these different orders of words? Thanks.
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 1 month ago
  • How do you uninstall a software update from iPhone 5s?

    Recently, I had an update which messed up some of my apps. I have been trying to find ways to uninstall it. But, I can't do it. I have gone through these steps on my phone: SETTINGS -> GENERAL -> IPHONE STORAGE After the last step, I can't find the DELETE UPDATE option. Can someone help me with my issue? Does anyone have the same... show more
    Recently, I had an update which messed up some of my apps. I have been trying to find ways to uninstall it. But, I can't do it. I have gone through these steps on my phone: SETTINGS -> GENERAL -> IPHONE STORAGE After the last step, I can't find the DELETE UPDATE option. Can someone help me with my issue? Does anyone have the same problem with the iPhone 5s? Thanks a lot.
    2 answers · Mobile Phones & Plans · 2 months ago
  • Can you use "oppress" in this sentence?

    I am going to make up a sentence below. (ex) Tough challenges constantly oppress him throughout his life. Do you think "oppress" fits the sentence>
    I am going to make up a sentence below. (ex) Tough challenges constantly oppress him throughout his life. Do you think "oppress" fits the sentence>
    4 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • Does the verb "incur" work in my friend's sentence?

    My friend works in the Financial Aid Department in his school. Here is one of the statements he wrote in a weekly school newsletter. (ex) Students who incur financial difficulties can apply for financial aid starting in the second week of every month. Do you think the word "incur" works in his sentence? Thanks.
    My friend works in the Financial Aid Department in his school. Here is one of the statements he wrote in a weekly school newsletter. (ex) Students who incur financial difficulties can apply for financial aid starting in the second week of every month. Do you think the word "incur" works in his sentence? Thanks.
    4 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • Is this the correct word sequence?

    There are a few colleges in the area where my friend Jack lives. He sent our other friends and me a message about where we will be meeting when we travel to his home country next month. This is part of what he said. (ex) We are going to meet in the Psychology Department of Dunkon College, 2nd floor, room 256, 5489 East Bellingway. Do you think... show more
    There are a few colleges in the area where my friend Jack lives. He sent our other friends and me a message about where we will be meeting when we travel to his home country next month. This is part of what he said. (ex) We are going to meet in the Psychology Department of Dunkon College, 2nd floor, room 256, 5489 East Bellingway. Do you think this word sequence which describes the location of our meeting correct? What is your opinion?
    2 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • At least until vs until at least ... at most until?

    I am going to make up three sentences. (1) I will work with him at least until 2020. (2) I will work with him until at least 2020. (3) I will work with him at most until 2020. I have two questions. (A) Does the placement of "at least" in (1) and (2) really matter? (B) I think (3) sounds odd. Is there a proper phrase to replace... show more
    I am going to make up three sentences. (1) I will work with him at least until 2020. (2) I will work with him until at least 2020. (3) I will work with him at most until 2020. I have two questions. (A) Does the placement of "at least" in (1) and (2) really matter? (B) I think (3) sounds odd. Is there a proper phrase to replace "at most" in (3), meaning 2020 being the very last year I will work with him? Thanks.
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • A question about usage of "to conform"?

    Collins Dictionary defines "to conform" as follows: (1) if someone or something conforms to a pattern or type, they are very similar to it. (2) If you conform, you behave in the way that you are expected or supposed to behave. I am going to use it in a sentence. (ex) Mr. Brown is a strict math teacher and a tough marker. His students... show more
    Collins Dictionary defines "to conform" as follows: (1) if someone or something conforms to a pattern or type, they are very similar to it. (2) If you conform, you behave in the way that you are expected or supposed to behave. I am going to use it in a sentence. (ex) Mr. Brown is a strict math teacher and a tough marker. His students have to solve problems in ways that conform to his. Am I using it correctly? Thanks.
    5 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • Mixed opinions about "in" versus "at an" educational institution?

    There is a mix of opinions about whether or not you need an indefinite article when you talk about studying or taking courses at an educational institution. I am going to make up a few simple examples below. (1a) She wants to study in private school. (1b) She wants to study at a private school. (2a) He wants to take a few accounting courses in... show more
    There is a mix of opinions about whether or not you need an indefinite article when you talk about studying or taking courses at an educational institution. I am going to make up a few simple examples below. (1a) She wants to study in private school. (1b) She wants to study at a private school. (2a) He wants to take a few accounting courses in college. (2b) He wants to take a few accounting courses at a college. The (a)'s use 'in' whereas the (b)'s use 'at a'. Some people think if you use the (a)'s, you are emphasizing a particular level of education one is at. On the other hand, others think if you use the (b)'s, you are talking about the geographical location of an educational institution. Can I hear your opinion about this? Thanks.
    5 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • Different from or than?

    I am going to write down four similar sentences below. (1) They have different opinions of the issue from what I have. (2) They have different opinions of the issue than what I have. (3) They have different opinions of the issue from I do. (4) They have different opinions of the issue than I do. Initially, I made up (1) and discussed it with my... show more
    I am going to write down four similar sentences below. (1) They have different opinions of the issue from what I have. (2) They have different opinions of the issue than what I have. (3) They have different opinions of the issue from I do. (4) They have different opinions of the issue than I do. Initially, I made up (1) and discussed it with my friends. They revised it and created the next three. Which ones, if any, are grammatically correct?
    4 answers · Words & Wordplay · 2 months ago
  • Does it make sense to say: A.M. classes?

    I have a lot of friends. When I see them, I tell them this: (ex) During my free time, I take courses for my personal interest. I prefer A.M. classes because I work as an accountant in the afternoon. Some of my friends are confused by A.M. classes, which refer to morning classes. Is it wrong to say A.M. classes? If I said "A.M. classes"... show more
    I have a lot of friends. When I see them, I tell them this: (ex) During my free time, I take courses for my personal interest. I prefer A.M. classes because I work as an accountant in the afternoon. Some of my friends are confused by A.M. classes, which refer to morning classes. Is it wrong to say A.M. classes? If I said "A.M. classes" to you, would you understand me? Thanks.
    4 answers · Words & Wordplay · 3 months ago
  • Fights or fighting in action movies?

    The other day, I asked my friend why he liked action movies. (ex) He replied,"Because I really like fights or the fighting in these movies." Which one "fights" or "fighting" sounds better in the sentence? Thanks.
    The other day, I asked my friend why he liked action movies. (ex) He replied,"Because I really like fights or the fighting in these movies." Which one "fights" or "fighting" sounds better in the sentence? Thanks.
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 3 months ago
  • Is it correct to say: From nine or ten years ago on ... didn't work much for seven years?

    Three days ago, I made friends with a non-native English speaking person. I am not native English speaking either. This is what he said to me. (ex) He said to me,"From nine or ten years ago on, I didn't work much for seven years because I was semi-retired." I think he meant nine or ten years ago, he started not working much. From... show more
    Three days ago, I made friends with a non-native English speaking person. I am not native English speaking either. This is what he said to me. (ex) He said to me,"From nine or ten years ago on, I didn't work much for seven years because I was semi-retired." I think he meant nine or ten years ago, he started not working much. From that point on, he didn't work much for seven.... Is it grammatically correct to say "From nine or ten years ago on" to connect with "didn't work much for seven years"? Thanks.
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 3 months ago