• Battery Report on Windows 8 says Full Charge Capacity is greater than the Design Capacity?

    I have an old Acer laptop, and my girlfriend had an old Sony laptop. When my new Acer laptop died, I decided, hey, I'm going to make my own laptop with the remains. After taking the RAM, HDD, and DVD drive from her Sony laptop and putting it into my (better) older laptop, it worked! The laptop itself was purchased back in late 2015, and after... show more
    I have an old Acer laptop, and my girlfriend had an old Sony laptop. When my new Acer laptop died, I decided, hey, I'm going to make my own laptop with the remains. After taking the RAM, HDD, and DVD drive from her Sony laptop and putting it into my (better) older laptop, it worked! The laptop itself was purchased back in late 2015, and after a Windows 10 upgrade it died in early 2016. I would attempt to fix the HDD several times throughout 2016, but essentially it only had about a 1 hour run time before I would give up. Moving to today, I now have the laptop up and running perfectly like it was new. The only thing is, I was expecting the battery to be close to dead... However, after doing a cmd inquiry, it states the following: Installed Batteries: Design Capacity - - - - - - - 55, 944mWh Full Charge Capacity - - - 57, 420 mWh Now I am aware that keeping a laptop off for an extended period of time would hurt the battery, as would keeping it plugged in.. But I never did the later of the two, and the battery has been lasting an exceptional amount of time. So this makes me beg the question: Is the battery ACTUALLY better, if even possible, than what it was originally designed for? I am unsure if maybe the design capacity is a rough estimate, or if it is a very specific number, but the battery runs great, so I'm completely lost for words! In Short: Can a battery actually charge for more than the design capacity?
    2 answers · Laptops & Notebooks · 3 months ago