• Could anyone please tell me how to pronounce the following French phrase as well as its meaning: "dessin plus"?

    I think it's pronounced like [desən plew]. Is that correct? Thank you.
    I think it's pronounced like [desən plew]. Is that correct? Thank you.
    4 answers · Languages · 1 month ago
  • Could anyone explain the meanings or rhetorics of the following two sentences?

    1. There is no more a problem of truth in wrestling than in the theatre. (Does this mean restling is a show?) 2. Skinny is no more a choice than is fat. (Does this mean being skinny is as serious a problem as is being fat?)
    1. There is no more a problem of truth in wrestling than in the theatre. (Does this mean restling is a show?) 2. Skinny is no more a choice than is fat. (Does this mean being skinny is as serious a problem as is being fat?)
    2 answers · Words & Wordplay · 5 months ago
  • Please rate the following collocations in terms of correctness and frequency.?

    Rate the best one as 5 and the wrong one as 1. By the word "party," I mean "social gathering," not "political party." 1. take part in a party 2. attend a party 3. go to a party 4. join in a party If you know a better collocation, please tell me. Many thanks in advance.
    Rate the best one as 5 and the wrong one as 1. By the word "party," I mean "social gathering," not "political party." 1. take part in a party 2. attend a party 3. go to a party 4. join in a party If you know a better collocation, please tell me. Many thanks in advance.
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 5 months ago
  • What would you call a sentence that contains more than one mistake? For example, (see below)?

    "Compearing to him, my is quite a good life though i am poor financial." Compearing → Compared him → his my → mine i → I financial → financially How about "combined mistakes", "composite mistakes," "compound mistakes," "complex mistakes"? I need as simple a phrase as possible. Thank you.
    "Compearing to him, my is quite a good life though i am poor financial." Compearing → Compared him → his my → mine i → I financial → financially How about "combined mistakes", "composite mistakes," "compound mistakes," "complex mistakes"? I need as simple a phrase as possible. Thank you.
    2 answers · Words & Wordplay · 6 months ago
  • What's the difference between "right to vote" and "voting right"?

    Is it appropriate to see the former as the right to vote in governmental elections, whereas the latter as the right to vote in any kind organization such as schools, corporations, or other institutions?
    Is it appropriate to see the former as the right to vote in governmental elections, whereas the latter as the right to vote in any kind organization such as schools, corporations, or other institutions?
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 6 months ago
  • Which is the best phrase among those below to describe seafood poetically and appreciatively?

    1. Blessings from the sea 2. Blessings from the ocean 3. Gift from the sea 4. Gift from the ocean 5. Gifts from the sea 6. Gifts from the ocean If you happen to hit on an even better phrase, please let me know. Many thanks in advance.
    1. Blessings from the sea 2. Blessings from the ocean 3. Gift from the sea 4. Gift from the ocean 5. Gifts from the sea 6. Gifts from the ocean If you happen to hit on an even better phrase, please let me know. Many thanks in advance.
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 6 months ago
  • Could you answer the following questions about the passage below?

    PASSAGE: There was something in his eyes. A mysterious, shifting, narrow look, almost too light-blue: of a cat who walked by himself, or of a man waiting in an alley with a cigarette, the collar of his black leather jacket turned up against the night. QUESTIONS: 1. Are "something in his eyes" and "a mysterious, shifting, narrow... show more
    PASSAGE: There was something in his eyes. A mysterious, shifting, narrow look, almost too light-blue: of a cat who walked by himself, or of a man waiting in an alley with a cigarette, the collar of his black leather jacket turned up against the night. QUESTIONS: 1. Are "something in his eyes" and "a mysterious, shifting, narrow look" in apposition? 2. Does the phrase "of a cat who walked by himself" modify "a mysterious, shifting, narrow look"? 3. What does this phrase mean? 4. Does "of a man waiting in an alley with a cigarette" modify "a mysterious, shifting, narrow look" as well? 5. How does the phrase "the collar of his black leather jacket turned up against the night" function in the sentence? Can I add "with" before that phrase to make it a sentence of attendant circumstances?
    1 answer · Homework Help · 6 months ago
  • What exactly is a shifting look? Could you paraphrase it in simple words?

    THERE was something in his eyes. A mysterious, shifting, narrow look, almost too light-blue: of a cat who walked by himself, or of a man waiting in an alley with a cigarette, the collar of his black leather jacket turned up against the night. Or the look of a shape-shifting lizard which, with age and weathering, Johnny Hallyday increasingly... show more
    THERE was something in his eyes. A mysterious, shifting, narrow look, almost too light-blue: of a cat who walked by himself, or of a man waiting in an alley with a cigarette, the collar of his black leather jacket turned up against the night. Or the look of a shape-shifting lizard which, with age and weathering, Johnny Hallyday increasingly resembled: living from day to day, adapting to every fashion, at home in no particular place.
    6 answers · Words & Wordplay · 6 months ago
  • What does "to be rooted" in the following quote mean?

    “To be rooted is perhaps the most important and least recognized need of the human soul.” - by Shimone Weil (French philosopher)
    “To be rooted is perhaps the most important and least recognized need of the human soul.” - by Shimone Weil (French philosopher)
    5 answers · Quotations · 6 months ago
  • Which is logically correct?

    1. His story is too good to be true. You mustn't be deceived. 2. His story is too good to be true. You can't be deceived.
    1. His story is too good to be true. You mustn't be deceived. 2. His story is too good to be true. You can't be deceived.
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 6 months ago
  • Is the following correct?

    "I hate losing a friend" implies that the speaker actually has an experience of losing a friend, whereas "I hate to lose a friend" doesn't necessarily imply he/she has the experience, but he/she just doesn't want to lose a friend.
    "I hate losing a friend" implies that the speaker actually has an experience of losing a friend, whereas "I hate to lose a friend" doesn't necessarily imply he/she has the experience, but he/she just doesn't want to lose a friend.
    6 answers · Words & Wordplay · 7 months ago
  • What does "bless her" in the following passage mean?

    I remember the exact moment my father became my mother. It was on the telephone, about a year after Mum died. When Mum was dying of cancer, we all worried about how losing her would mean losing our whole family. She held us all together. Dad was just, well, there. More imposing than furniture, but almost silent. Mum was the one who cleaned, baked,... show more
    I remember the exact moment my father became my mother. It was on the telephone, about a year after Mum died. When Mum was dying of cancer, we all worried about how losing her would mean losing our whole family. She held us all together. Dad was just, well, there. More imposing than furniture, but almost silent. Mum was the one who cleaned, baked, cooked the holiday meals, entertained. She helped us girls paint and wallpaper and tried, BLESS HER, to teach us to be proper housewives. She made our rambling country house a real home.
    1 answer · Words & Wordplay · 7 months ago
  • Which is the correctly tagged question, (1) or (2)?

    (1) She is not only pretty but also kind, is she? (2) She is not only pretty but also kind, isn't she? A third option might be: She is not only pretty but also kind, don't you think? Many thanks in advance.
    (1) She is not only pretty but also kind, is she? (2) She is not only pretty but also kind, isn't she? A third option might be: She is not only pretty but also kind, don't you think? Many thanks in advance.
    3 answers · Words & Wordplay · 7 months ago
  • Could you rearrange the words in the parenthesis below so that the whole sentence makes sense?

    Theresa May is the 27th Oxonian Prime Minister, (being / three / her / last / the / predecessor) David Cameron, Tony Blair, and of course, Margaret Thatcher. This is actually from a grammar book, but I personally think "predecessor" should be pluralized and "the" is unnecessary. The answer I've come up with is: Theresa May... show more
    Theresa May is the 27th Oxonian Prime Minister, (being / three / her / last / the / predecessor) David Cameron, Tony Blair, and of course, Margaret Thatcher. This is actually from a grammar book, but I personally think "predecessor" should be pluralized and "the" is unnecessary. The answer I've come up with is: Theresa May is the 27th Oxonian Prime Minister, her last three predecessors being) David Cameron, Tony Blair, and of course, Margaret Thatcher. Am I correct?
    2 answers · Languages · 7 months ago