• Do you think the Christian Crusades against the Islamic world were justified at the time?

    Best answer: Morally not. Politically it is possible. Muslims had at that time killed about half of the Christian population including the destruction of about 10000 churches in North Africa. Sorry I am not able to find the video where I learned this, but it is somewhere on this page: https://www.facebook.com/WretchedNetwork?fref=ts show more
    Best answer: Morally not. Politically it is possible. Muslims had at that time killed about half of the Christian population including the destruction of about 10000 churches in North Africa. Sorry I am not able to find the video where I learned this, but it is somewhere on this page: https://www.facebook.com/WretchedNetwork...
    13 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • How do I pray?

    Best answer: Daniel 9:4-19 is a great instruction in prayer with weight on confession. 9:4–19 I prayed. Various aspects of the passage give rich instruction regarding prayer. True prayer is: in response to the Word (v. 2), characterized by fervency and self-denial (v. 3), identified unselfishly with God’s people (v. 5), strengthened by... show more
    Best answer: Daniel 9:4-19 is a great instruction in prayer with weight on confession. 9:4–19 I prayed. Various aspects of the passage give rich instruction regarding prayer. True prayer is: in response to the Word (v. 2), characterized by fervency and self-denial (v. 3), identified unselfishly with God’s people (v. 5), strengthened by confession (vv. 5–15), dependent on God’s character (vv. 4, 7, 9, 15), and has as its goal, God’s glory (vv. 16–19). Far too often, prayer is viewed as a “magic formula.” Some believe that if we do not say exactly the right things, or pray in the right position, God will not hear and answer our prayer. This is completely unbiblical. God does not answer our prayers based on when we pray, where we are, what position our body is in, or in what order we word our prayers. We are told in 1 John 5:14-15 to have confidence when we come to God in prayer, knowing He hears us and will grant whatever we ask as long as it is in His will. Similarly, John 14:13-14 declares, “And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Son may bring glory to the Father. You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it.” According to these and many other Scriptures, God answers prayer requests based on whether they are asked according to His will and in the name of Jesus (to bring glory to Jesus). So, what is the proper way to pray? Philippians 4:6-7 tells us to pray without being anxious, to pray about everything, and to pray with thankful hearts. God will answer all such prayers with the gift of His peace in our hearts. The proper way to pray is to pour out our hearts to God, being honest and open with God, as He already knows us better than we know ourselves. We are to present our requests to God, keeping in mind that God knows what is best and will not grant a request that is not His will for us. We are to express our love, gratitude, and worship to God in prayer without worrying about having just the right words to say. God is more interested in the content of our hearts than the eloquence of our words. The closest the Bible comes to giving a “pattern” for prayer is the Lord’s Prayer in Matthew 6:9-13. Please understand that the Lord’s Prayer is not a prayer we are to memorize and recite to God. It is an example of the things that should go into a prayer—worship, trust in God, requests, confession, and submission. We are to pray for the things the Lord’s Prayer talks about, using our own words and “customizing” it to our own journey with God. The proper way to pray is to express our hearts to God. Sitting, standing, or kneeling; hands open or closed; eyes opened or closed; in a church, at home, or outside; in the morning or at night—these are all side issues, subject to personal preference, conviction, and appropriateness. God’s desire is for prayer to be a real and personal connection between Himself and us. Read more: http://www.gotquestions.org/how-to-pray....
    9 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Why Jesus prayed to His Father and divulge his divinity: Jhn 17:1-5 Ver. 3. This is life everlasting; the way to life everlasting, that?

    Best answer: 17:5 glorify Me together with Yourself. Having completed His work (v. 4), Jesus looked past the cross and asked to be returned to the glory that He shared with the Father before the world began (see 1:1; 8:58; 12:41). The actual completion of bearing judgment wrath for sinners was declared by Christ in the cry, “It is finished”... show more
    Best answer: 17:5 glorify Me together with Yourself. Having completed His work (v. 4), Jesus looked past the cross and asked to be returned to the glory that He shared with the Father before the world began (see 1:1; 8:58; 12:41). The actual completion of bearing judgment wrath for sinners was declared by Christ in the cry, “It is finished” (19:30). MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Jn 17:5). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers. He surly affirmed His Divinity.
    3 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • @ Oneness: Is the Father the CHRIST in Micah 5:2?

    Best answer: 5:2–4 This passage looked forward to Christ’s First Advent (5:2), an intervening time (5:3a), and beyond to the Second Advent (5:3b, 4). 5:2 Bethlehem Ephrathah. The town S of Jerusalem which was the birthplace of David and later Jesus Christ (1Sa 16; Mt 2:5; Lk 2:4–7). The name Bethlehem means “house of bread” because the area was a... show more
    Best answer: 5:2–4 This passage looked forward to Christ’s First Advent (5:2), an intervening time (5:3a), and beyond to the Second Advent (5:3b, 4). 5:2 Bethlehem Ephrathah. The town S of Jerusalem which was the birthplace of David and later Jesus Christ (1Sa 16; Mt 2:5; Lk 2:4–7). The name Bethlehem means “house of bread” because the area was a grain producing region in OT times. The name Ephrathah (“fruitful”) differentiates it from the Galilean town by the same name. The town, known for her many vineyards and olive orchards, was small in size but not in honor. from long ago, From the days of eternity. This speaks of eternal God’s incarnation in the person of Jesus Christ. It points to His millennial reign as King of Kings (cf. Is 9:6). MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Mic 5:2–4). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers. How can Oneness Pentecostals explain the moment Jesus was baptized? All three persons was present at the same time!
    1 answer · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • Did Jesus teach Christians to obey the Ten Commandments? If so, are Christians bound by God's moral law?

    Best answer: All the Ten Commandments are repeated and confirmed in NT except one, the Sabbath. Today we have The Lord`s Day. The Ten Commandments are the sum of the whole in God`s law. Matthew 22 are the sum of all Scriptures teachings. 37 Jesus said to him, “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all... show more
    Best answer: All the Ten Commandments are repeated and confirmed in NT except one, the Sabbath. Today we have The Lord`s Day. The Ten Commandments are the sum of the whole in God`s law. Matthew 22 are the sum of all Scriptures teachings. 37 Jesus said to him, “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and great commandment. 39 And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ 40 On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets.” 22:40 the whole Law and the Prophets. I.e., the whole OT. Thus Jesus subsumes man’s whole moral duty under two categories: love for God, and love for one’s neighbors. These same two categories differentiate the first 4 commandments of the Decalogue from the final 6. We now obey out of love for God, not to obtain salvation or anything else. For He Himself is our peace, who made both groups into one, and broke down the barrier of the dividing wall, by abolishing in His flesh the enmity, which is the Law of commandments contained in ordinances, that in Himself He might make the two into one new man, thus establishing peace, (Ephesians 2:14–15) Christ forever broke down (the Greek aorist tense signifies completed action) every dividing wall by abolishing in His flesh the enmity, which is the Law of commandments contained in ordinances. When Jesus died on the cross He abolished every barrier between man and God and between man and his fellow man. The greatest barrier between Jew and Gentile was the ceremonial law, the Law of commandments contained in ordinances. The feasts, sacrifices, offerings, laws of cleanliness and purification, and all other such distinctive outward commandments for the unique separation of Israel from the nations were abolished. That God’s moral law was not abolished is clear from the phrase contained in ceremonies. His moral law reflects His own holy nature and therefore can never change (cf. Matt. 5:17–19). That is the law which for the Jews was summarized in the Ten Commandments and which for all men is written on their hearts (Rom. 2:15) and still commanded of them (Matt. 22:37–40; Rom. 13:8–10). Jesus summarized God’s moral law still further by declaring, “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, even as I have loved you” (John 13:34). The Ten Commandments, like all of God’s moral laws, are but the structured and particularized love that God still requires (James 2:8).
    20 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • How do you know that a painting had a painter or that a building had a builder?

    Best answer: Same reason I know the universe have to have a Creator. Genesis 1 The History of Creation 1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
    Best answer: Same reason I know the universe have to have a Creator. Genesis 1 The History of Creation 1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
    12 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • Why do some claim to be Apostles today?

    Best answer: There are no more Apostles today. Their claims are easily refuted as false. Mostly they would claim it for money, women and power as all false teachers do. They are self centered and never glorifying Christ. The Greek word [apostolos /ap·os·tol·os/] n m. From 649; TDNT 1:407; TDNTA 67; GK 693; 81 occurrences; AV translates as... show more
    Best answer: There are no more Apostles today. Their claims are easily refuted as false. Mostly they would claim it for money, women and power as all false teachers do. They are self centered and never glorifying Christ. The Greek word [apostolos /ap·os·tol·os/] n m. From 649; TDNT 1:407; TDNTA 67; GK 693; 81 occurrences; AV translates as “apostle” 78 times, “messenger” twice, and “he that is sent” once. 1 a delegate, messenger, one sent forth with orders. 1A specifically applied to the twelve apostles of Christ. 1B in a broader sense applied to other eminent Christian teachers. 1B1 of Barnabas. 1B2 of Timothy and Silvanus. Strong, J. (2001). Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software. So it can mean just a messenger. However there have been only 14 Apostles sent out by Jesus personally. One was fake and went to hell (Judas). One was a special Apostle for the Gentiles (Paul). The criteria for being an Apostle is set for ever in Acts 1. The first of the gifted men in the New Testament church were the apostles, of whom Jesus Christ Himself is foremost (Heb. 3:1). The basic meaning of apostle (apostolos) is simply that of one sent on a mission. In its primary and most technical sense apostle is used in the New Testament only of the twelve, including Matthias, who replaced Judas (Acts 1:26), and of Paul, who was uniquely set apart as apostle to the Gentiles (Gal. 1:15–17; cf. 1 Cor. 15:7–9; 2 Cor. 11:5). The qualifications for that apostleship were having been chosen directly by Christ and having witnessed the resurrected Christ (Mark 3:13; Acts 1:22–24). Paul was the last to meet those qualifications (Rom. 1:1; etc.). It is not possible therefore, as some claim, for there to be apostles in the church today. Some have observed that the apostles were like delegates to a constitutional convention. When the convention is over, the position ceases. When the New Testament was completed, the office of apostle ceased. The term apostle is used in a more general sense of other men in the early church, such as Barnabas (Acts 14:4), Silas and Timothy (1 Thess. 2:6), and a few other outstanding leaders (Rom. 16:7; 2 Cor. 8:23; Phil. 2:25). The false apostles spoken of in 2 Cor. 11:13 no doubt counterfeited this class of apostleship, since the others were limited to thirteen and were well known. The true apostles in the second group were called “messengers (apostoloi) of the churches” (2 Cor. 8:23), whereas the thirteen were apostles of Jesus Christ (Gal. 1:1; 1 Pet. 1:1; etc.). Apostles in both groups were authenticated “by signs and wonders and miracles” (2 Cor. 12:12), but neither group was self–perpetuating. In neither sense is the term apostle used in the book of Acts after 16:4. Nor is there any New Testament record of an apostle in either group being replaced when he died.
    6 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • Is Ecclesiastes 3 right in saying there is a time to kill, a time to hate, and a time for war?

    Best answer: 3:1–8 an appointed time. Not only does God fix the standard and withhold or dispense satisfaction (2:26), but He also appoints “times.” Earthly pursuits are good in their proper place and time, but unprofitable when pursued as the chief goal (cf. vv. 9, 10). 3:9, 10 Earthly pursuits (vv. 1–8) are unprofitable when considered as life’s... show more
    Best answer: 3:1–8 an appointed time. Not only does God fix the standard and withhold or dispense satisfaction (2:26), but He also appoints “times.” Earthly pursuits are good in their proper place and time, but unprofitable when pursued as the chief goal (cf. vv. 9, 10). 3:9, 10 Earthly pursuits (vv. 1–8) are unprofitable when considered as life’s chief good, which was never intended by God MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Ec 3:1–9). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers. When the Bible does speak of God hating, the object of God’s hatred is usually sin and wickedness. Among the things God hates are idolatry (Deuteronomy 12:31; 16:22) and those who do evil (Psalm 5:4-6; 11:5). Proverbs 6:16-19 outlines seven things the Lord hates: pride, lying, murder, evil plots, those who love evil, false witness, and troublemakers. Notice that this passage does not include just things that God hates; it includes people as well.
    11 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • Why God not answering my prayers?

    Best answer: To pray in Jesus name simply means to pray according to His will. There are several reasons listed in the Bible why God does not hear or answer prayers. 1. Sin in your life that is unrepentant “The LORD is far from the wicked: but he heareth the prayer of the righteous” (Proverbs 15:29). “And when ye spread forth your hands, I will... show more
    Best answer: To pray in Jesus name simply means to pray according to His will. There are several reasons listed in the Bible why God does not hear or answer prayers. 1. Sin in your life that is unrepentant “The LORD is far from the wicked: but he heareth the prayer of the righteous” (Proverbs 15:29). “And when ye spread forth your hands, I will hide mine eyes from you: yea, when ye make many prayers, I will not hear: your hands are full of blood” (Isaiah 1:15). “He that turneth away his ear from hearing the law, even his prayer shall be abomination” (Proverbs 28:9). “Yea, they made their hearts as an adamant stone, lest they should hear the law, and the words which the LORD of hosts hath sent in his spirit by the former prophets: therefore came a great wrath from the LORD of hosts. Therefore it is come to pass, that as he cried, and they would not hear; so they cried, and I would not hear, saith the LORD of hosts” (Zechariah 7:12-13). “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me” (Psalm 66:18). “But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid his face from you, that he will not hear” (Isaiah 59:2). 2. You pray to satisfy your own egoistic needs. “Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts” (James 4:3). 3. Hypocrisy “For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul? Will God hear his cry when trouble cometh upon him?” (Job 27:8-9). “Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do honour me, but have removed their heart far from me, and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men” (Isaiah 29:13). Here is one prayer God always hears. Psalms 51 Open my lips, Lord, and my mouth will declare your praise. 16 You do not delight in sacrifice, or I would bring it; you do not take pleasure in burnt offerings. 17 My sacrifice, O God, is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart you, God, will not despise.
    11 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Believers, why do does it seem like God is taking his time to rid the sin and scoffers of the world? Why not do it immediately?

    Best answer: God is patient, that is why He is waiting. 2 Peter 3 8 But, beloved, do not forget this one thing, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. 9 The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all... show more
    Best answer: God is patient, that is why He is waiting. 2 Peter 3 8 But, beloved, do not forget this one thing, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. 9 The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance. 3:9 not slow. That is, not loitering or late (cf. Gal 4; 4; Tit 2:13; Heb 6:18; 10:23, 37; Rev 19:11). patient toward you. “You” is the saved, the people of God. He waits for them to be saved. God has an immense capacity for patience before He breaks forth in judgment (cf. v. 15; Joel 2:13; Lk 15:20; Ro 9:22; 1Pe 3:15). God endures endless blasphemies against His name, along with rebellion, murders, and the ongoing breaking of His law, waiting patiently while He is calling and redeeming His own. It is not impotence or slackness that delays final judgment; it is patience. not wishing for any to perish. The “any” must refer to those whom the Lord has chosen and will call to complete the redeemed, i.e., the “you.” Since the whole passage is about God’s destroying the wicked, His patience is not so He can save all of them, but so that He can receive all His own. He can’t be waiting for everyone to be saved, since the emphasis is that He will destroy the world and the ungodly. Those who do perish and go to hell, go because they are depraved and worthy only of hell and have rejected the only remedy, Jesus Christ, not because they were created for hell and predetermined to go there. The path to damnation is the path of a non-repentant heart; it is the path of one who rejects the person and provision of Jesus Christ and holds on to sin (cf. Is 55:1; Jer 13:17; Eze 18:32; Mt 11:28; 23:37; Lk 13:3; Jn 3:16; 8:21, 24; 1Ti 2:3, 4; Rev 22:17). all to come to repentance. “All” (cf. “you,” “any”) must refer to all who are God’s people who will come to Christ to make up the full number of the people of God. The reason for the delay in Christ’s coming and the attendant judgments is not because He is slow to keep His promise, or because He wants to judge more of the wicked, or because He is impotent in the face of wickedness. He delays His coming because He is patient and desires the time for His people to repent. MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (2 Pe 3:9). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
    14 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • How do you grow in love for God, your neighbor, and yourself?

    Best answer: By growing in knowledge in His word, and living in obedience to it. Micah 6 8 He has shown you, O man, what is good; And what does the Lord require of you But to do justly, To love mercy, And to walk humbly with your God? God will do the work of creating love in us. That is impossible to obtain on own effort. Fruit is nothing we... show more
    Best answer: By growing in knowledge in His word, and living in obedience to it. Micah 6 8 He has shown you, O man, what is good; And what does the Lord require of you But to do justly, To love mercy, And to walk humbly with your God? God will do the work of creating love in us. That is impossible to obtain on own effort. Fruit is nothing we produce. It is produced in us by the Holy Spirit, by the grace of God. Galatians 5 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law. 24 And those who are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. 25 If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit. 26 Let us not become conceited, provoking one another, envying one another.
    4 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Are sins ever forgiven?

    Best answer: 1 John 1:9 must be the most applicable verse in this context. 9 If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 1:9 Continual confession of sin is an indication of genuine salvation. While the false teachers would not admit their sin, the genuine Christian... show more
    Best answer: 1 John 1:9 must be the most applicable verse in this context. 9 If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 1:9 Continual confession of sin is an indication of genuine salvation. While the false teachers would not admit their sin, the genuine Christian admitted and forsook it (Ps 32:3–5; Pr 28:13). The term “confess” means to say the same thing about sin as God does; to acknowledge His perspective about sin. While v. 7 is from God’s perspective, v. 9 is from the Christian’s perspective. Confession of sin characterizes genuine Christians, and God continually cleanses those who are confessing (cf. v. 7). Rather than focusing on confession for every single sin as necessary, John has especially in mind here a settled recognition and acknowledgment that one is a sinner in need of cleansing and forgiveness (Eph 4:32; Col 2:13). MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (1 Jn 1:9). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
    5 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Do you ever feel like something terrible is about to happen?

    Best answer: The world will end at the prescribed time. Even science would not disagree that one day the world will end. That will not be a terrible day for God`s people. Revelation 21 The New Heaven and Earth 21 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea. 2 And I... show more
    Best answer: The world will end at the prescribed time. Even science would not disagree that one day the world will end. That will not be a terrible day for God`s people. Revelation 21 The New Heaven and Earth 21 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea. 2 And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, made ready as a bride adorned for her husband. a new heaven and a new earth. The entire universe as we now know it will be destroyed (2Pe 3:10–13) and be replaced by a new creation that will last forever. This is an OT reality (Ps 102:25, 26; Is 65:17; 66:22), as well as a NT one (Lk 21:33; Heb 1:10–12). See note on 20:11–15. no longer any sea. Currently three-fourths of the earth’s surface is water, but the new environment will no longer be water-based and will have completely different climatic conditions.
    7 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • How does moses make his tea?

    Best answer: How does Moses make his tea? Hebrews it. Jew kiddin me. No Israeli how he does it. R U Syrias? I Caanaan tell a lie. Maybe the closest you come to tea in the Bible. Ezekiel 47:12 And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither, nor their fruit fail, but they... show more
    Best answer: How does Moses make his tea? Hebrews it. Jew kiddin me. No Israeli how he does it. R U Syrias? I Caanaan tell a lie. Maybe the closest you come to tea in the Bible. Ezekiel 47:12 And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither, nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing.”
    12 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Why do Catholics do Novenas?

    Best answer: The word novena derives from the Latin word for “nine.” A novena is a series of prayers prayed over a nine-day or nine-hour period. The prayers are repeated to obtain special graces or as a sign of devotion to God. Usually a novena involves making a specific request or expressing a specific intent. Prayers may come from the rosary or... show more
    Best answer: The word novena derives from the Latin word for “nine.” A novena is a series of prayers prayed over a nine-day or nine-hour period. The prayers are repeated to obtain special graces or as a sign of devotion to God. Usually a novena involves making a specific request or expressing a specific intent. Prayers may come from the rosary or from prayer books, or they may be written by the petitioner. Usually the same prayer is prayed every day for nine days, or the same series of prayers is prayed. A nine-day novena has prayers made at the same time each day; a nine-hour novena has a prayer at the same time each hour. Novenas are primarily practiced by Catholics, although some members of the Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches also say novenas. There are, in general, four categories of novenas. Mourning novenas are said following the death of a loved one; a special novemdiales is said following the death of a pope. Preparation novenas are said before a major religious holiday, such as Easter or Christmas. Prayer novenas are said to obtain special graces, and may consist of prayers from prayer books, recitation of the rosary, or other small prayers through the day. Indulgence novenas are prayed to alleviate the temporal punishment for one’s sins, including the sins of those in purgatory. Novenas are often prayed to specific saints and may be public or private; public ones require special mass attendance or the daily lighting of a candle. The supposed efficacy of a novena depends on the piety and devotion of the individual performing it. Most Catholics resent the superstitious supposition that a novena is a sort of spiritual chain letter, the idea that saying a novena for a given amount of time virtually guarantees that one’s request will be granted. The novena is perhaps loosely derived from Scripture. It is thought that the time between the ascension of the Lord Jesus and the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost was nine days. Acts 1:14 says that the disciples spent that time continuing “with one accord in prayer.” However, the ancient Romans also observed a nine-day period of prayer following the death of a loved one, or to avert some evil predicted by a soothsayer. Ultimately, the novena is based more on tradition than on Scripture, which contains a prohibition against “vain repetition” in prayer (Matthew 6:7-8). The concept behind novenas is not explicitly unbiblical, but the prayer content in the vast majority of novenas is unbiblical. It is true that we are exhorted to pray continually (Luke 18:1-8; 1 Thessalonians 5:17). However, we need to be sure that our prayers are thoughtful, God-centered and God-honoring. Read more: http://www.gotquestions.org/what-is-a-no...
    4 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • What is the meaning of 'the infallibility of the Church'?

    Best answer: The infallibility of the Church is the belief that the Holy Spirit preserves the Church from errors that would corrupt its essential doctrines. It is related to, but not the same as, the indefectibility of the Church, which is the belief that "the Church is indefectible, that is, she remains and will remain the Institution of... show more
    Best answer: The infallibility of the Church is the belief that the Holy Spirit preserves the Church from errors that would corrupt its essential doctrines. It is related to, but not the same as, the indefectibility of the Church, which is the belief that "the Church is indefectible, that is, she remains and will remain the Institution of Salvation, founded by Christ, until the end of the world." It is a Catholic thing and not real. Christ`s church has almost from the beginning of being infiltrated with false teachers and false teachings. Jesus talks about the wheat and weeds growing together and we can not distinguish by any human means (Matthew 13:28-30) 28 And he said to them, ‘An [q]enemy has done this!’ The slaves *said to him, ‘Do you want us, then, to go and gather them up?’ 29 But he *said, ‘No; for while you are gathering up the tares, you may uproot the wheat with them. 30 Allow both to grow together until the harvest; and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers, “First gather up the tares and bind them in bundles to burn them up; but gather the wheat into my barn.”’” God`s word alone is infallible. We teach that the Word of God is an objective, propositional revelation (1 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Corinthians 2:13), verbally inspired in every word (2 Timothy 3:16), absolutely inerrant in the original documents, infallible, and God-breathed. We teach the literal, grammatical-historical interpretation of Scripture which affirms the belief that the opening chapters of Genesis present creation in six literal days (Genesis 1:31; Exodus 31:17). We teach that the Bible constitutes the only infallible rule of faith and practice (Matthew 5:18; 24:35; John 10:35; 16:12-13; 17:17; 1 Corinthians 2:13; 2 Timothy 3:15-17; Hebrews 4:12; 2 Peter 1:20-21).
    15 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • What does Paul's statement in 1 thessalonians2:10 reflect about the way he lived?

    Best answer: 2:10 You are witnesses. Under OT law it took two or more witnesses to verify truth (Nu 35:30; Dt 17:6; 19:15; 2Co 13:1). Here Paul called on both the Thessalonians and God as witnesses to affirm his holy conduct in the ministry. Cf. 2Co 1:12. MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (1 Th... show more
    Best answer: 2:10 You are witnesses. Under OT law it took two or more witnesses to verify truth (Nu 35:30; Dt 17:6; 19:15; 2Co 13:1). Here Paul called on both the Thessalonians and God as witnesses to affirm his holy conduct in the ministry. Cf. 2Co 1:12. MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (1 Th 2:10). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
    4 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 3 years ago
  • Are OT laws against incest, homosexuality, and bestiality universal moral laws, or mere disciplinary laws of Judaism?

    Best answer: It is both. According to Romans 1 all men have in them a natural consciousness there is a God and an objective moral law. However Romans 1 also tells us that men reject this, and Jesus tells us men love the darkness more then the light because men`s deeds are evil. God`s moral law, as found in the OT, stands as well in NT times. The ... show more
    Best answer: It is both. According to Romans 1 all men have in them a natural consciousness there is a God and an objective moral law. However Romans 1 also tells us that men reject this, and Jesus tells us men love the darkness more then the light because men`s deeds are evil. God`s moral law, as found in the OT, stands as well in NT times. The ceremonial law, and the judicial law in the Old Testament is not valid today (http://www.gotquestions.org/ceremonial-l... He said in Matthew 5 Christ Fulfills the Law 17 “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. 18 For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled. 5:17 Do not think … abolish the Law or the Prophets. Jesus was neither giving a new law nor modifying the old, but rather explaining the true significance of the moral content of Moses’ law and the rest of the OT. “The Law and the Prophets” speaks of the entirety of the OT Scriptures, not the rabbinical interpretations of them. fulfill. This speaks of fulfillment in the same sense that prophecy is fulfilled. Christ was indicating that He is the fulfillment of the law in all its aspects. He fulfilled the moral law by keeping it perfectly. He fulfilled the ceremonial law by being the embodiment of everything the law’s types and symbols pointed to. And He fulfilled the judicial law by personifying God’s perfect justice (cf. 12:18, 20). 5:18 until heaven and earth pass away … until all is accomplished. Here Christ was affirming the utter inerrancy and absolute authority of the OT as the Word of God—down to the smallest stroke or letter. Again (see note on v. 17), this suggests that the NT should not be seen as supplanting and abrogating the OT, but as fulfilling and explicating it. For example, all the ceremonial requirements of the Mosaic law were fulfilled in Christ and are no longer to be observed by Christians (Col 2:16, 17). Yet not the smallest letter or stroke is thereby erased; the underlying truths of those Scriptures remain—and in fact the mysteries behind them are now revealed in the brighter light of the gospel. smallest letter or stroke. The phrase “smallest letter” refers to the smallest Heb. letter, the yohd, which is a meager stroke of the pen, like an accent mark or an apostrophe. The “stroke” is a tiny extension on a Heb. letter, like the serif in modern typefaces.
    9 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Why do people believe that God is a loving God, yet in Exodus 34 6-7 He speaks also of "Not letting the guilty go unpunished"?

    Best answer: Exodus 34:6 And the Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abounding in goodness and truth, 7 keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children and the... show more
    Best answer: Exodus 34:6 And the Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abounding in goodness and truth, 7 keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children and the children’s children to the third and the fourth generation.” This is one of the great testimonies to the character of God. God is loving, however always just. He shows us his love every day that we live, and not are killed because of our sins. God is longsuffering not wanting anyone to perish, but waiting for us to repent and turn to Christ. 20:5, 6 on the third and the fourth generations … thousands. Moses had made it clear that children were not punished for the sins of their parents (Dt 24:16; see Eze 18:19–32), but children would feel the impact of breaches of God’s law by their parents’ generation as a natural consequence of its disobedience, its hatred of God. Children reared in such an environment would imbibe and then practice similar idolatry, thus themselves expressing hateful disobedience. The difference in consequence served as both a warning and a motivation. The effect of a disobedient generation was to plant wickedness so deeply that it took several generations to reverse. MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Ex 20:5). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
    14 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago
  • Does "do not judge" mean "do not speak out against ISIS murdering children because of their religion?

    Best answer: Matthew 7:1 "Do not judge, or you too will be judged. 7:1 Do not judge. As the context reveals, this does not prohibit all types of judging (v. 16). There is a righteous kind of judgment we are supposed to exercise with careful discernment (Jn 7:24). Censorious, hypocritical, self-righteous, or other kinds of unfair judgments are... show more
    Best answer: Matthew 7:1 "Do not judge, or you too will be judged. 7:1 Do not judge. As the context reveals, this does not prohibit all types of judging (v. 16). There is a righteous kind of judgment we are supposed to exercise with careful discernment (Jn 7:24). Censorious, hypocritical, self-righteous, or other kinds of unfair judgments are forbidden; but in order to fulfill the commandments that follow, it is necessary to discern dogs and swine (v. 6) from one’s own brethren (vv. 3–5). MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Mt 7:1). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers. Telling the truth about false teachings and false teachers is never judging. It is our duty.
    7 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 years ago