• Mommies do you consider your baby's diapers to be cute?

    Best answer: Everything babies do is cute. Their clothes are cute, their food is cute, their blankets are cute, and their activities are cute. When my two were little that song 'I'm Too Sexy' came out and the bigger one (age 4-5) would sing, 'I'm too sexy for my shirt....' We thought it amusing till the littler one (age 2)... show more
    Best answer: Everything babies do is cute. Their clothes are cute, their food is cute, their blankets are cute, and their activities are cute. When my two were little that song 'I'm Too Sexy' came out and the bigger one (age 4-5) would sing, 'I'm too sexy for my shirt....' We thought it amusing till the littler one (age 2) would sing, 'I'm too sexy for my diaper' and we just fell out in hysterics at that.
    2 answers · Newborn & Baby · 1 year ago
  • What is the logic of piano? If someone can explain to me that i may be able to understand how to play it?

    Best answer: Take the sheet music on the music rack of the piano and turn it on its side, so that the top margin is now to the right. Then, read downwards. The higher notes will be to your right, the lower notes to your left, the same as in the piano keyboard. I know a guy who taught himself piano this way. The piano is often considered the most... show more
    Best answer: Take the sheet music on the music rack of the piano and turn it on its side, so that the top margin is now to the right. Then, read downwards. The higher notes will be to your right, the lower notes to your left, the same as in the piano keyboard. I know a guy who taught himself piano this way. The piano is often considered the most basic of instruments because, unlike nearly any others in the Western world, it has all its notes as individual keys. Most other instruments, strings, brass, woodwinds, have a much more limited musical range and require often-weird fingering to get desired sounds out of them. With piano, all you do is locate the right note and press the key-- kind of like typing on a computer keyboard, only they're all in a row. Once a student gets past the Columbus stage ('I search for it, I discover it, I land on it') of keyboard fingering, believe me, it starts getting much easier. When he taught us at home, my dad wrote with pencil on the ivory keys to indicate the notes. I did the same for my own kids. I don't know how much musical theory you know, but the white and black keys are both equally notes, just with different tonal spaces between them. They are different colours to make them easier to see. In most 'white' key signatures, the black keys are the half-tones. In 'black' key signatures, you might use one or two, at most, white keys. Many songs are written specifically for one key or another; many are also easily transposed to another key without detracting from the song's feel. Transposing may be easiest on piano of all instruments; it's done all the time by pros. The other great attribute of the piano is its application to chord theory. Brass, woodwinds, even some strings (like violin) don't play chords well; but on the piano, since all the notes are right in front of you, all you need is enough fingers in the right places and you can play 10 or 12 notes at a time! That's one great chord. So, because of this, a lot of chord theory is taught to non-piano players on piano, just to make it more visible and viable. For example, I've played in a number of bands and the worst ones were always those *led by* a singer who couldn't get two notes together out of a piano on purpose. The best musicians all know at least a little of the piano. This is true everywhere, at all levels. If you are truly interested, see a local teacher. Most will be able to give you a few moments before or between lessons to just 'try you out' at a keyboard to see what you'd like to learn and what you may be able to do. Then, if you're still game, sign up for a few lessons. Most comprehensive (US: public) schools will give lessons through their music departments (and most don't charge a fee for instrument rental since they already have their own piano!). You can acquire a cheap plastic electronic keyboard (with headphones) for very little money and have one at home for practice. Don't be afraid of it! --and please don't hate it! I promise no piano ever attacked a willing student. :)
    2 answers · Performing Arts · 2 years ago
  • Could be governments be using children as spies?

    Best answer: North Vietnam routinely sent innocent-looking kids into the South to befriend US soldiers and tag along to see what they were doing and where they went. It helped; because the NVA learned what bars or brothels they went to and regularly attacked them. The NVA also regularly used small children as shoeshine boys in the South. The kid... show more
    Best answer: North Vietnam routinely sent innocent-looking kids into the South to befriend US soldiers and tag along to see what they were doing and where they went. It helped; because the NVA learned what bars or brothels they went to and regularly attacked them. The NVA also regularly used small children as shoeshine boys in the South. The kid would offer to shine your boots, you would pay him in American, and he would open his little bag and set off the bomb, blowing you and himself up at once. This type of thing went on all the time. If they couldn't get information from you, they'd trick you into being put out of action. It's called an all-out war on home soil. * * *
    4 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • MLA format quoting help?

    Best answer: If you are referring to quoting more than one line of dialogue from a book, include it as a blockquote and in two lines/paragraphs. (Jonnie Comet's rule 1 of writing dialogue: one paragraph per speaker, one speaker per paragraph!). So your paper would look like: yourtextblahblah: 'I wonder if they put my letter in the... show more
    Best answer: If you are referring to quoting more than one line of dialogue from a book, include it as a blockquote and in two lines/paragraphs. (Jonnie Comet's rule 1 of writing dialogue: one paragraph per speaker, one speaker per paragraph!). So your paper would look like: yourtextblahblah: 'I wonder if they put my letter in the book!... Maybe they're savin' it for later.' 'An' that's just what they done'. [46-47] moreofyourtext. (Always include quotations from source material, eve when more than one line of dialogue, in sentences of your own. Never just slam the quotes into the work without direct relevance. This is YOUR paper-- you are using these quotes to make YOUR points, not filling up space on the paper with them. If you can't relate them directly to what you're writing, that's saying you shouldn't include them at all.) Last I taught it, MLA permitted/required single-spacing for blockquotes, double-indented. Vis.: if your paper is set for 1/4" first-line indents (and use the margin markers, NOT tabs), make the left margin of the blockquote 1/4" and the first line at 1/4" indents. Strictly speaking the right margin should then be set at 1/4" as well-- though I have seen this not done (and not taught). ALL your lines of dialogue from the same quoted passage remain in the same block of blockquoted text, even though they are technically separate paragraphs-- return to the 'normal' body settings ONLY after you are done with the FULL quote in this place. Do try to have more than ONE line of your own writing between multiple blocks of multi-line, blockquoted text. It just looks like you're doing more work that way! Much of these MLA rules are probably on the Web nowadays anyway. You could look it up. * * *
    1 answer · Books & Authors · 3 years ago
  • Help on a close reading for a passage in Pride and Prejudice?

    Best answer: This particular passage is anything BUT 'feminist'! Here Mrs Bennet is congratulating herself on what she believes is the inevitable engagement of Mr Bingley, their handsome new neighbour, and her eldest daughter Jane whom Bingley has clearly admired from their first meeting. Her goal is to set up the shy, gentle, ladylike... show more
    Best answer: This particular passage is anything BUT 'feminist'! Here Mrs Bennet is congratulating herself on what she believes is the inevitable engagement of Mr Bingley, their handsome new neighbour, and her eldest daughter Jane whom Bingley has clearly admired from their first meeting. Her goal is to set up the shy, gentle, ladylike Jane, who is already 21/22 (too old, in 1795, to be single with no BFs) as an example to her other daughters, of whom the next two, Elizabeth (20) and Mary (19) do not look likely to attract husbands on their own (for very different reasons). Mrs B is impressed ('animated' --brought alive) by the knowledge that Bingley has an income of about 5000 quid per year (possibly 500,000 in modern money), making him, in her view, an excellent catch. Note that she makes no mention of either Jane's or Bingley's best interests; she is eager to be rid of a daughter and quantifies, rather than qualifies, his value. This is important to her for two reasons: 1. If she doesn't get Jane married, the others will grow older yet in waiting-- as per convention at the time-- for their elder sister to marry first. Note that, later, Lizzy will remark to Lady Catherine that all five of the girls are 'out' (husband-hunting) at once. Lady Catherine is shocked. So, in a way, Mrs B is right to be concerned and eager to have Jane happily and financially-comfortably married. 2. She wishes to impress the local neighbourhood. If HER daughter marries the eligible bachelor, the Bennets will suddenly look much cooler. Remember that Mr B is not well-off; his lands do not earn what he would like and he'll have all of FIVE dowries to pay off before he's in the clear. The Bennets need to look respectable. Also, as this party is taking place at the Lucas house, she would love to show off to Mrs Lucas that a Bennet girl is the lucky choice of Bingley, especially since Charlotte Lucas is all of 27/28, not particularly beautiful (as Jane certainly is) and somewhat frumpy, unromantic (by her own admission) and intellectual-- decidedly UN-feminine and so unlikely to ever attract a husband. (Note whom Charlotte does eventually attract! --talk about a mismatch!) As an aside, note that Elizabeth is very chill with Charlotte, as Lizzy sees only the worth of characters rather than the beauty of faces, being both too pretty and too intelligent to value them in reverse. To her Charlotte is a good friend-- so watch carefully as they sort of fall out as friends later-- and know WHY. Be sure to refer directly to specific bits of the actual text in your paper-- general statements (like I just made) will not fly. But if you use this, relate what I said to the proper place in the text and you should be all right. I used to assign three of these exposition essays for every major work I taught, and anyone who can read and is not lazy should be able to get it. Good luck! * * *
    3 answers · Books & Authors · 3 years ago
  • Do writers get paid when their book is turned into a pantomime or play or musical?

    Best answer: Only if the party doing the adaptation pays for the rights, which is their legal obligation to do when using or adapting a copyrighted work. It has nothing to do with ticket sales; 'The Producers' is a farce for a reason. You adapt the work, you pay the author. THEN you sell tickets. Smart authors will ask for a percentage of... show more
    Best answer: Only if the party doing the adaptation pays for the rights, which is their legal obligation to do when using or adapting a copyrighted work. It has nothing to do with ticket sales; 'The Producers' is a farce for a reason. You adapt the work, you pay the author. THEN you sell tickets. Smart authors will ask for a percentage of the show; but up-front money almost always changes hands first.
    6 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • Fantasy World in Novel?

    Best answer: In my estimation you have two options. The first is the more nerdlike-- that is to provide some sort of foreword or preface in which you describe the setting and its attributes. This has been done often, especially in science fiction novels (ala Larry Niven) and isn't entirely terrible. However it does appear somewhat prosaic... show more
    Best answer: In my estimation you have two options. The first is the more nerdlike-- that is to provide some sort of foreword or preface in which you describe the setting and its attributes. This has been done often, especially in science fiction novels (ala Larry Niven) and isn't entirely terrible. However it does appear somewhat prosaic and may tend to bore people from the off. The second is to do the opposite, to do exactly what you're afraid will lose people. Start straight off by immersing the character in her world, encountering fantastic creatures, using weird slang and terms, referring to events no-one knows of, and so on. Load it up-- write it well; but don't apologise anywhere for being so esoteric and far-out. Just let it be there. This places the burden on you, the writer, to then fully develop the 'real world' environment as well, to make it a marked contrast to the fantastic world, to show the difference. Once the reader has read into the real-world part of the narrative, he will begin to get what the story is about. This works best if the first such segment is not too long-- about the length of a decent prologue, between 1 and 3 pages. Longer than that and the contrast will be harder to do well; shorter (like if the real-world passage begins on the same page) and it'll have less effect. A good example is the opening scene in 'Labyrinth', the film, when Sara is in the park enacting the scene from the book. At first we don't know what she is about-- is this a sword-and-sorcery story or is this girl just out of her mind? When the rain begins and she hikes up her mediaeval kirtle to run and we see the bottoms of her (modern) jeans, the contrast is complete. This is the kind of 'transition' (really a glaring contrast) you will have to put in to pull this off; but, if you can, I say go with the second option.
    4 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • Should my band stop doing covers and only do originals from now on?

    Best answer: I agree with Danny, Russel and Jonathan. I would add that, to wean yourself towards all- or mostly-covers, try wedging the odd original into your covers repertoire. From my experience, I say don't even announce it. For a lot of people, when they see a young band saying from the stage, 'Okay, this is one we wrote... show more
    Best answer: I agree with Danny, Russel and Jonathan. I would add that, to wean yourself towards all- or mostly-covers, try wedging the odd original into your covers repertoire. From my experience, I say don't even announce it. For a lot of people, when they see a young band saying from the stage, 'Okay, this is one we wrote ourselves', they will go off and get a drink or visit the toilet. To a lot of people it's almost a cliche. During the '70s and '80s I wrote a lot of material, individually and with my band, that sounded very much like what was already out there. This sounds unoriginal; but it was what we did (and wanted to do) to sound *as good as* those other guys. We had Frampton numbers and Thin Lizzy numbers and Queen numbers and KISS numbers. If we were playing one from one of those artistes we would play our own right after it, or right before it, and just not announce it, just play it like it was one of that guy's, like it was no big deal. People might come up later and say, 'What was that one you did after "Shine On"? Did I hear that on "Frampton Comes Alive"?' We took this as a very high compliment. It's like the philosophy of 'It's better to apologise after than to ask permission before'. You throw in an unannounced original, it's fait accompli; you can't take it back now. The bar manager will frown at you and scold you-- but ONLY if no-one in the room liked it. If you're any good at songwriting, if you KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE (which is always rule no.1), no-one will truly hate it. Do this regularly, and people will identify the original(s) as part of your sound, just like they were identifying you by your covers selection last month. As you're able to to more and more of the originals, revamp your covers to sound like more of your own stuff. Then, ultimately, you'll just save the covers for the encores. :)
    8 answers · Performing Arts · 2 years ago
  • Which look goes better for my Icelandic character?

    Best answer: I suggest that, unless the appearance of the character is absolutely vital to the story (as in 'Legally Blonde', for example) that you get on with writing the plot and character development and not obsess too much over her appearance. In most works of fiction, excessive attention by the narrator or author to what a... show more
    Best answer: I suggest that, unless the appearance of the character is absolutely vital to the story (as in 'Legally Blonde', for example) that you get on with writing the plot and character development and not obsess too much over her appearance. In most works of fiction, excessive attention by the narrator or author to what a (opposite-sex) character looks like suggests shallowness or even vanity. Never mind it. We don't read your story for how she looks; we read it for what she does and, most importantly, WHY she does it. 'All stories are about characters.' --JC. You may find that, as the storyteller, you end up just not caring what she looks like. Then just make her adequately attractive (perhaps only as pretty as any likeable character needs to be) and let her personality, and the situations in which she finds herself, be her most endearing traits. Trust me-- we'll love her. In my series 'Deirdre, the Wanderer', the female narrator deliberately does not describe herself much in physical terms. As we discover she is short, slight, blondish and blue-eyed, it's only because it's time for those points to have bearing on the story (such as when she is harassed by a bigoted German because, with her blue eyes, he mistakes her for a fellow Nordic). Otherwise it's just not necessary. But in fact this absence of physical description was to make her as average and unexciting as possible, no greater than any girl who might read the book. She is no-one special; she could be you. Fleming chose the name 'James Bond' because he wanted the most bland-sounding name possible. He also wanted Bond to look bland, unexciting, almost boring. Think about it-- these are vital traits for a secret agent. Making female lead characters too gorgeous tends to turn off many female readers, of all ages. It's a bad cliche. It also might deter readers of other ethnicities. Just have viable reasons for making your character look as she does. I am writing one now in which the heroine is a very pretty, young, Norwegian-English-Austrian ballerina with a slender shape, grey-blue eyes and long blonde hair; but that's important only because the hero's mother looked much the same at the same age, suggesting that as heir to his father's title he has found a girl who already looks, to the people, like she could step into the countess's role. It's a play on looks. If she looked Greek or southern Italian, even if I personally found that look pretty, it wouldn't play here. I'm saying that if you need to describe the character physically, have a reason like that (again, like in 'Legally Blonde'). Otherwise is may turn out to be either uneconomical in words or just distracting to readers.
    3 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • UK - How do I get an ISBN for my book?

    Best answer: The publisher does this for you. If you are publishing independently, CreateSpace and Kindle will assign you one. You can go to Bowker's online and purchase one (or a block of ten, for all your future various revisions). A typical (good) fee will be about 6-10 quid. If it's more than that, find another option. Note that with... show more
    Best answer: The publisher does this for you. If you are publishing independently, CreateSpace and Kindle will assign you one. You can go to Bowker's online and purchase one (or a block of ten, for all your future various revisions). A typical (good) fee will be about 6-10 quid. If it's more than that, find another option. Note that with CreateSpace and others, you will have to complete a viable publishing-ready file of the book and submit it, then the ISBN will be assigned, then you go back to your book file, add the ISBN into the front matter, and resubmit with the revised file. I have been doing this for years and haven't figured out a better process for it. If you are going straight to Kindle, KDP will assign an ASIN for your work. Typically (though not always immediately) I will go back to the HTML file and add this in, resubmitting with the revised file as above. E-texts deserve proper front matter too (though abbreviated, like maybe 4-5 lines; leave the hard-core stuff for the back matter because e-text readers just want to get to the reading of it). I am glad you are thinking of this, as books without ASIN (assigned to various media, especially electronic, that don't fit into standard hard-copy publishing) and ISBN (hard-copy books) look awfully amateurish. For that matter, books with poorly-prepared front matter do too. Look at other books you have in hard copy (or look at some of mine!). Model yours on what's been done properly before.
    2 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • How do you put someone else s thoughts in a novel?

    Best answer: This is a good question. Really it's up to you. When I write a major character's internal thoughts, I usually write them in normal narrative, only in the first person (given a third-person POV. In a 1st-person POV this is more problematic). The change between my usual narrative in SWEE (Standard Written and Edited English,... show more
    Best answer: This is a good question. Really it's up to you. When I write a major character's internal thoughts, I usually write them in normal narrative, only in the first person (given a third-person POV. In a 1st-person POV this is more problematic). The change between my usual narrative in SWEE (Standard Written and Edited English, which precludes contractions, slang, and fragments) and the character's own idiom is usually enough for the reader to tell them apart. Your character can read other people's thoughts, which is different. I would say to use italics. If you put them in quotes, a reader may confuse this for things spoken aloud. Also, it's kind of amateurish (too many people misuse quotations marks for emphasis; if you get a reader who does, he may not know what you mean). I would set up a style in the style palate called 'italics', choose a different colour, even a different font (but one the same size as the body) and use this for all the thoughts. You can alter this prior to publication, changing the font and colour according to how it should be published, but leave it as different to help you edit. When you convert it for e-text, having a separate style (and especially colour!) will make it easy to locate the places for the HTML instructions. I do this all the time with mine. Always avoid underlining anything-- this went out with typewriters; and all editors, instructors and publishers will disdain it. Ditto for bold. In ordinary narrative and dialogue, use italics for emphasis. Use bold only for emphasis WITHIN the italicised text, such as in one of those passages of other people's thoughts. Avoid using ALL CAPS except when the person is yelling even more loudly than before, when you used an exclamation point, even more than where you used italics.
    6 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • Can a character in book or film kill its author? Is it even possible? How?

    Best answer: If you feature the author as a character in the story, you don't have to address the fact that that author wrote this book. Just make yourself a 'real-life' character and have the antagonist kill that character. This is cool because you can write yourself as any sort of person you like-- it might enhance your... show more
    Best answer: If you feature the author as a character in the story, you don't have to address the fact that that author wrote this book. Just make yourself a 'real-life' character and have the antagonist kill that character. This is cool because you can write yourself as any sort of person you like-- it might enhance your notoriety! This is particularly simple if the book is written in the third-person omniscient point of view. The bigger question comes when you write such a book in the first person. How can the narrator of a first-person narrative be killed off? It immediately begs the question of how the doomed/dead narrator has been able to tell this story so far, and especially afterwards. In my 'Deirdre, the Wanderer' series, the narrator apparently comes to grief at the end of the third volume; but the reader has to know she survives somehow because, even though the 'climax' occurs in the very last line, there IS a fourth volume, so apparently she lives through the accident. My uncle wrote 'Up In Smoke' about a maniacal woman who manages to kill off her sons and other people she hates using the most insidious, subtle ways. The narrator reports his suspicions on this in the course of the book. His original ending was that the narrator begins to feel ill after several weekly lunch visits to this character whilst researching this story. You are meant to have the idea that she is poisoning him and the ending of the book happens when it does only because he is no longer around to finish the story. Alas, he changed the ending to something happier, which, whilst adequate, is nowhere near as good, in my opinion, as his first version.
    8 answers · Books & Authors · 2 years ago
  • I am in high school, and I don't play a sport. What else can I do to boost up my college app?

    Best answer: Out-of-school activities count too. Any job, social work, charity, and so on, in which you are involved makes you look more interesting. I used to tell my students (in public/comprehensive school) that this is ONE time when religious participation can do your education some material good (it's supposed to be a non-issue otherwise).... show more
    Best answer: Out-of-school activities count too. Any job, social work, charity, and so on, in which you are involved makes you look more interesting. I used to tell my students (in public/comprehensive school) that this is ONE time when religious participation can do your education some material good (it's supposed to be a non-issue otherwise). Church attendance, and especially anything else you do there, makes you appear more wide-ranging, outward-looking, involved and committed. If you mind children, mention it. If you mow lawns, mention it. If you care for horses just to get to ride them, mention it. Play this stuff up like it's something really grand. If you and your girlfriend sold homemade jewellry, say you started a distribution business with a peer. If you mopped up at your uncle's restaurant, say you contributed to the family business. If you baked muffins for a homeless family, say you worked to help the needy. None of this is lying; and they won't ever check. They just want to see what you do besides greedily seeking high grades and a high starting salary. And don't neglect any and all clubs you have been in at school; chess and gospel choir and everything else may indicate someone they want at their institution. You never know when you may encounter a university counsellor who donates old clothing to the same Salvation Army place as you do. Good luck.
    3 answers · Financial Aid · 3 years ago
  • How to get into college if you've been denied?

    Best answer: Apply to all the schools you might like to attend, so long as you can afford the application fees. Typically public (state) schools tend to waive them if you ask, or else not charge them at all. I always advised my students (as many teachers do) to apply to the one you really want, another you'd really like, one safe backup and... show more
    Best answer: Apply to all the schools you might like to attend, so long as you can afford the application fees. Typically public (state) schools tend to waive them if you ask, or else not charge them at all. I always advised my students (as many teachers do) to apply to the one you really want, another you'd really like, one safe backup and then one dream school-- the one you expect to not get into at all, even though you are, on paper, qualified. For example I applied at both Oxford and Cambridge, as my grades were adequate for them; but I turned down both when I discovered neither had the curriculum I wanted to take. Someone in my family said, 'You realise Oxford and Cambridge are only for the very best students; right?' She didn't realise I might well have been one of the best students. 'Never let anyone tell you you don't deserve what you want.' --Patrick Verona (Heath Ledger), 'Ten Things I Hate About You'. A university will be impressed by someone who consistently applies and expects to get in. They will consider you on the strength of your numbers, sure; but it's on the 'intangible' points like personality, interests, experience, intended courses of study, and so on that the best schools will make up their mind about you. Write a good application essay and include details that not everyone would. (As a teacher I made this part of my 11th- and 12th-year classes' assigned work.) See your counsellors for other clues. A good counsellor at school is the one who knows the individual schools, will make phone calls for you, will advise you on your essay and current coursework and will attend with you when university people visit your school. If you've already graduated, go back to the old school and ask their help anyway. Most if not all of the time they will be happy to help. If you've got nothing going on at all, consider a year at the local community college. Meet with their counsellors and make sure that whatever you take there will indeed transfer to the most demanding of your intended schools. They will be able to compare requirements and put you in the best courses. Also, make time to get a proper job, even if only part-time. Attending community college, working at the same time, and still striving to enter your preferred school will impress the heck out of them. Then you'll get in next year. Above all, do not give up. So many of these decisions will seem like major life-defining events to you, and you want to think one 'no' means your whole life's dream is dead; but in reality the people at the college who decide are doing it much more casually than we'd like to admit. Any subsequent term may be a whole new ballgame (such as in January, for example). So keep trying.
    3 answers · Financial Aid · 3 years ago
  • Gap year or university? HELPPP?

    Best answer: I agree with Amaretta except to add that, if you do go out for a job, and you're sure you're intending on architecture, get a job in construction or in something related. I studied for architecture in the 1970s and was appalled to find how few licensed architects actually have hands'-on building experience. They don't... show more
    Best answer: I agree with Amaretta except to add that, if you do go out for a job, and you're sure you're intending on architecture, get a job in construction or in something related. I studied for architecture in the 1970s and was appalled to find how few licensed architects actually have hands'-on building experience. They don't know a hawk from a handsaw. The truth is that many, or even most, of them design pies-in-the-sky and then apply the bulk of their expensive labour on preparing the implausible design to meet building codes and budgets. It's not about design-- the cool part-- at all. The Prince of Wales, in his excellent 1985 book, 'A Vision Of Britain', complained that there are (then) NO university programmes of study in Britain that graduate architects with any education in the classical forms. Witness the abject dearth of new (post-1970s) buildings in Britain with any real pedigree in proper design and art. They're all over-the-top free-form monstrosities, paying no respect to environment, utility, history or aesthetics at all. I wrote about this in 1997: http://jonniecometsabsolutist.blogspot.c... If you're going into architecture, but not this year, spend your gap learning what's needed in the field. Are you in it for more money; or are you in it to do some good for the world? The Greeks considered architecture the highest of art forms, requiring the greatest expense, the greatest effort and the greatest investment in the neighbourhood for posterity. Design matters; it's not something disposable or faddy that you're supposed to be making. So think about what you want to do as an architect, and then fill your gap studying, seeing sights, going places and perhaps even interviewing people in the field and those affected by it. It'll be exciting; and you'll have gained more than a year off. You'll have put yourself head-and-shoulders above all the other candidates (and future graduates) --and will have enhanced your application essay and interview, for when you do go, as well as cultivating your own architectural philosophy into the bargain. Good luck.
    2 answers · Higher Education (University +) · 3 years ago
  • Can you be in virtual school and regular school at the same time?

    Best answer: It might be a lot of work; but I see no reason why not and as a teacher would actually encourage it. Be sure to connect with your counsellors about how to apply these credits. If you are only in 8th now; you may have a good chance of actually skipping a whole year. If not, you may be able to just transfer over to the college or... show more
    Best answer: It might be a lot of work; but I see no reason why not and as a teacher would actually encourage it. Be sure to connect with your counsellors about how to apply these credits. If you are only in 8th now; you may have a good chance of actually skipping a whole year. If not, you may be able to just transfer over to the college or university without formally graduating high school (this has happened with several students I've known). But knowing what courses you are taking, knowing what they are good for, and DOING WELL in them is most important. There's no point in bring home poor marks in a college class during 9th grade-- worse, they may stay on your record and you'll be carrying a handicap going into college or uni for good. I am sure that a motivated, reasonably-advanced student could take 1 or 2 online college courses, through a local junior college, all throughout 9th, 10th and 11th year-- after which time he could have 36 credits knocked off, which is a whole year and a half of college credit. By that time you might not need 12th year at all.
    2 answers · Other - Education · 3 years ago
  • Was this ageist/sexist?

    Best answer: I am a 50s male, a former teacher and a single parent of two girls; and I'd tell you to let it go. In a way, maybe not a way in which you want to see it, it's a weird kind of compliment. The reality-- whether or not you're willing to accept it-- is that by selecting Proust to read you just elevated the perceived level of... show more
    Best answer: I am a 50s male, a former teacher and a single parent of two girls; and I'd tell you to let it go. In a way, maybe not a way in which you want to see it, it's a weird kind of compliment. The reality-- whether or not you're willing to accept it-- is that by selecting Proust to read you just elevated the perceived level of intelligence of teenaged girls. From now on that guy will probably be watching what girls your age pick to read; and after all the Hunger Games and other junk that comes across his paying desk, he'll be impressed by the Plath and Wilde and Burney he sees. And why should he not? --you admit yourself you're a teenaged girl and you must have some notion of the erroneous assumptions much of the world makes about that demographic. I told you my demographic to make a point. I raised two girls on my own and they grew up intelligent, sensible, tasteful, honest, virtuous and beautiful. The point? --that you probably prefer to consider yourself that way as well. Most girls would like to be thought of that way-- and not as mere eye candy or as a marketing goldmine or as insensible morons. So maybe you should be proud that you just raised the bar. Judgemental people like the guy at the paying desk just got a wake-up call. Most girls should probably be thanking you. Also I am a lit scholar (British 18th C, concentration in women and family-- i.e., Jane Austen) and I never read Proust. So as one literary person to another, do promise to tell me how it goes. :) I wish I had more students like you in my classes.
    6 answers · Books & Authors · 3 years ago
  • So if i'm writing a book called Into the Future. what would the sequel be called?

    Best answer: 'Beyond the Future' --?
    Best answer: 'Beyond the Future' --?
    7 answers · Books & Authors · 3 years ago
  • Is this a good thesis statement? Improvement ideas?

    Best answer: Neither of these is a 'thesis statement' as both are made up of multiple sentences. Try this: limit yourself to 25 words and explain the major point the paper is going to make. If there's anything someone would not understand, or if there's anything more important that's not mentioned in it, revise it. But rather... show more
    Best answer: Neither of these is a 'thesis statement' as both are made up of multiple sentences. Try this: limit yourself to 25 words and explain the major point the paper is going to make. If there's anything someone would not understand, or if there's anything more important that's not mentioned in it, revise it. But rather than overcomplicating the matter, keep it simple to start. Once it's workable, you can polish it later. Also-- better check with your prof if 'I'-statements are allowed. As an instructor I frown on them. The attitude of the paper should be like a legal argument-- no pussyfooting about with 'I think', etc. State it outright-- really daring anyone else to say, 'oh, I disagree' --and then your paper's job will be to PROVE THAT POINT. I used to teach that the paper is like a lawyer in court. If it convinces the audience, it wins. If I can shoot holes in its theories, or point out what it failed to say at all, it loses. Write your paper with the attitude of 'Disprove THIS, you idiot!' and start with a bold, concise thesis statement that's written like a statement of fact.
    3 answers · Homework Help · 3 years ago
  • Where to learn to dance at a club?

    Best answer: I don't dance well either and only since getting old have I learnt that it doesn't matter at my age any more. :) You might want to find a sympathetic friend to show you some good moves. Most people who don't dance well tend to be rather tight as people as well-- too into control, self-control, looking good, putting on an... show more
    Best answer: I don't dance well either and only since getting old have I learnt that it doesn't matter at my age any more. :) You might want to find a sympathetic friend to show you some good moves. Most people who don't dance well tend to be rather tight as people as well-- too into control, self-control, looking good, putting on an image; and most people who dance well are either as happy as children, not caring how they look so long as they're having fun, or else loose, freewheeling, casual people whose bodies will follow their feelings and wishes. So the first thing would be to get yourself into a state of mind where you don't care. Then, do whatever you like. The truth is that, in most clubs, one of two things are happening (or both at once): 1. No-one is watching you; they're all watching their own partners or just having fun on their own. 2. No-one will judge you for what you look like, unless you look so weird that you suddenly look really cool for being so free and easy and unique. There are still some dance shows on TV on which you can watch other people. Mimic them. Even the old 'Soul Train' episodes from the 70s are still on. Mimic them, and people won't even know you're being 'retro'-- they'll think you're something all new. (Watch the 1980s film 'Can't Buy Me Love' with Patrick Dempsey for a very funny and yet believable example of this.) * * *
    1 answer · Dancing · 3 years ago