• Kid wears red perscription lenses?

    There's evidence, although more anecdotal than not, that rose-colored glasses can help with certain conditions, including reading disabilities and headaches. I can understand the hesitation to believe it, but it's usually better to just leave it alone than to push the issue. Personally, from what I've read on the topic, I do believe it... show more
    There's evidence, although more anecdotal than not, that rose-colored glasses can help with certain conditions, including reading disabilities and headaches. I can understand the hesitation to believe it, but it's usually better to just leave it alone than to push the issue. Personally, from what I've read on the topic, I do believe it can help some people, which isn't all that far-fetched considering anti-reflective coatings are known to help with visual comfort. As far as not being able to see the entire visual spectrum, I've never heard anything about that. It's more that parts of the spectrum supposedly are harsh to some people and may even interfere with the visual processing, kind of like noise on a line.
    3 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Glasses fog up all the time?

    Best answer: You can use anti-fog wipes/solution (or just do the old diver's trick and spit on them), or try and keep them warm. Also, breathe through your nose, as your breath will cause them to fog.
    Best answer: You can use anti-fog wipes/solution (or just do the old diver's trick and spit on them), or try and keep them warm. Also, breathe through your nose, as your breath will cause them to fog.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • What should I do about my eye?

    Best answer: Sounds like a corneal abrasion. If it's small (like smaller than your pupil in bright light) you should be fine. If it's larger, you should see an eye doctor as there's a risk of infection. It will heal quickly, within a day or two. Since you obviously didn't see a doctor today, assuming it doesn't get infected... show more
    Best answer: Sounds like a corneal abrasion. If it's small (like smaller than your pupil in bright light) you should be fine. If it's larger, you should see an eye doctor as there's a risk of infection. It will heal quickly, within a day or two. Since you obviously didn't see a doctor today, assuming it doesn't get infected overnight (and it probably won't since it sounds small) by the time you get up and check it tomorrow it may already be almost completely healed. Just use some eye drops if you have some to lubricate it and help it feel better.
    1 answer · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Why do i have eye pain around my eyes?

    Best answer: I doubt it's glaucoma. What it does sound like is possible optic neuritis, or inflammation of the optic nerve. You need to see an eye doctor soon to determine if this is what's going on. I don't want to scare you (too much) but this can be related to optic neuritis. It could also be Lyme disease if you've recently been... show more
    Best answer: I doubt it's glaucoma. What it does sound like is possible optic neuritis, or inflammation of the optic nerve. You need to see an eye doctor soon to determine if this is what's going on. I don't want to scare you (too much) but this can be related to optic neuritis. It could also be Lyme disease if you've recently been bitten by a tick. There are, of course, other possibilities as well, but only with an eye exam can they be narrowed down appropriately.
    4 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • How long will my eyes stay blury?

    Best answer: They really shouldn't be blurry for more than a few hours or so after swimming. If there's discharge or pain or your vision is extremely blurry you should see a doctor, otherwise give it a couple days.
    Best answer: They really shouldn't be blurry for more than a few hours or so after swimming. If there's discharge or pain or your vision is extremely blurry you should see a doctor, otherwise give it a couple days.
    1 answer · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Seeing a shadow out of corner of eye is it serios.?

    Best answer: This sounds like a Weiss ring, which is sometimes noticed after a posterior vitreous detachment. It's perfectly normal and benign, however if you experience flashes of light, a lot of floaters like gnats or dust particles in your vision, or missing spots of vision, it could mean that as the vitreous is detaching it's pulling the... show more
    Best answer: This sounds like a Weiss ring, which is sometimes noticed after a posterior vitreous detachment. It's perfectly normal and benign, however if you experience flashes of light, a lot of floaters like gnats or dust particles in your vision, or missing spots of vision, it could mean that as the vitreous is detaching it's pulling the retina off with it, and you need to get in to see an eye doctor immediately.
    3 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Left eye a little red and right eye white?

    Absent other symptoms, this could be very mild dryness or allergies, or it could just be idiopathic (unknown reason, basically it just happens sometimes). It's nothing to worry about as long as there's nothing else going on. Just don't use Visine to clear it up, it'll only make it worse in the long run.
    Absent other symptoms, this could be very mild dryness or allergies, or it could just be idiopathic (unknown reason, basically it just happens sometimes). It's nothing to worry about as long as there's nothing else going on. Just don't use Visine to clear it up, it'll only make it worse in the long run.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Eye tracking problems and surgery?

    Best answer: See an optometrist. It may be due to a disorder of how your eyes work together. They can evaluate you and determine if that's the case. Sometimes glasses or vision therapy can help with symptoms such as yours.
    Best answer: See an optometrist. It may be due to a disorder of how your eyes work together. They can evaluate you and determine if that's the case. Sometimes glasses or vision therapy can help with symptoms such as yours.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Is this a sign of my peripheral vision failing?

    Best answer: Your vision would have to be pretty bad for this to be due to a simple eyesight issue, bad enough I'm sure you would already be going to the doctor fairly regularly. This could be any number of things, but you should get yourself checked out. If you want to do a quick test on yourself to check your peripheral vision, just close or... show more
    Best answer: Your vision would have to be pretty bad for this to be due to a simple eyesight issue, bad enough I'm sure you would already be going to the doctor fairly regularly. This could be any number of things, but you should get yourself checked out. If you want to do a quick test on yourself to check your peripheral vision, just close or cover one eye, hold your hand out to the side, and wiggle your fingers while moving your hand in until you can see it. You should be able to see it at about a 45 degree angle in each direction, give or take. Also try closing one eye then the other when reading to see if there's a difference.
    4 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Contacts and grey rings around iris?

    Ideally you should actually clean them again each time you drop them, with rubbing, but you should be fine. The gray ring sound like arcus senilis, which is normal lipid deposits in the cornea. If that's what it is, if you're over 40 and it's equal between the eyes it's fine. If you're younger than 40 or it's not symmetric,... show more
    Ideally you should actually clean them again each time you drop them, with rubbing, but you should be fine. The gray ring sound like arcus senilis, which is normal lipid deposits in the cornea. If that's what it is, if you're over 40 and it's equal between the eyes it's fine. If you're younger than 40 or it's not symmetric, you should either have an eye exam, tell them about it, and get their advice, or just go straight to getting your lipids checked with your primary doctor. The problem with it not being symmetric is that can indicate a blockage of the carotid artery on the side that the ring is less prominent, so keep that in mind if you go straight to your family doc.
    5 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • What does it mean to have pressure behind your eye?

    The first thing that comes to mind is idiopathic intracranial hypertension (google IIH). Then again, it could be as simple as not getting enough sleep, either in quantity or quality. You should see an eye doctor followed by your family doctor.
    The first thing that comes to mind is idiopathic intracranial hypertension (google IIH). Then again, it could be as simple as not getting enough sleep, either in quantity or quality. You should see an eye doctor followed by your family doctor.
    3 answers · Infectious Diseases · 6 years ago
  • My left eye is -1.75 and my right eye is -1.50 is that bad?

    Best answer: It's all relative, but that's a relatively low prescription. Some people with that prescription would feel totally blind without their glasses, while many would not wear glasses. I can tell you that it's extremely unlikely you can drive legally without glasses. One way of looking at those numbers is by dividing 100 by them.... show more
    Best answer: It's all relative, but that's a relatively low prescription. Some people with that prescription would feel totally blind without their glasses, while many would not wear glasses. I can tell you that it's extremely unlikely you can drive legally without glasses. One way of looking at those numbers is by dividing 100 by them. This give you 57 and 67. This is how many cm in front of you things are clear. Past that point, things get progressively more blurry.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • What does it mean when you get brown around your pupil in your eye?

    Best answer: Eye color can change over time, and it is typically normal when it does. It could be due to genetics, UV exposure, or other factors, and there's not really much you can do about it. I wouldn't worry about it too much. As far as eating sugary foods, that won't have an effect on that, but if you do it excessively it will... show more
    Best answer: Eye color can change over time, and it is typically normal when it does. It could be due to genetics, UV exposure, or other factors, and there's not really much you can do about it. I wouldn't worry about it too much. As far as eating sugary foods, that won't have an effect on that, but if you do it excessively it will increase your chances of getting diabetes, something which has become far too common.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • My eye is twitching...?

    This is myokymia, and the common causes are stress, caffeine, and lack of sleep. It will go away on its own, though may take a few weeks, and very rarely longer. Get plenty of sleep, cut out caffeine and stress as much as possible, and if it doesn't go away in a month or so or you really can't stand it, you can try some over-the-counter... show more
    This is myokymia, and the common causes are stress, caffeine, and lack of sleep. It will go away on its own, though may take a few weeks, and very rarely longer. Get plenty of sleep, cut out caffeine and stress as much as possible, and if it doesn't go away in a month or so or you really can't stand it, you can try some over-the-counter allergy eye drops as they sometimes, for unknown reasons, can help relieve it.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • I don’t want more scratches. How?

    Best answer: This sounds like scratches from improperly cleaning the lenses. Only use the microfiber lens cloths, never use paper or cotton products (kleenex, paper towels, your shirt). It's possible you might be able to get the replaced under warranty, but don't count on it if that's what it's from (and they know the difference... show more
    Best answer: This sounds like scratches from improperly cleaning the lenses. Only use the microfiber lens cloths, never use paper or cotton products (kleenex, paper towels, your shirt). It's possible you might be able to get the replaced under warranty, but don't count on it if that's what it's from (and they know the difference between that and other scratches). If you do this, be sure to clean them properly in the future.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • How to make eyes stop burning?

    Best answer: Allergies are usually associated with itching. Burning is more a symptom of dryness and possibly inflammation. Try some lubricating drops (NOT Visine), lid scrubs (close your eyes and gently scrub along the lashes for 5-10 seconds in warm-hot water, and hot compresses (washcloth wet as hot as you can stand it and lay it over your closed... show more
    Best answer: Allergies are usually associated with itching. Burning is more a symptom of dryness and possibly inflammation. Try some lubricating drops (NOT Visine), lid scrubs (close your eyes and gently scrub along the lashes for 5-10 seconds in warm-hot water, and hot compresses (washcloth wet as hot as you can stand it and lay it over your closed eyes and gently scrub your eyes through it). If you're spending a lot of time reading or on the computer, you blink less so your eyes dry out more, so take breaks regularly.
    5 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Laser shined into my eyes?

    Unfortunately, many lasers (most not made in America, which is most of them, especially the cheaper ones like what would be used on a tour) have a higher output than they say. Still, red lasers, which I'm assuming this is, rarely cause injuries from accidental brief exposure, because the reflex to blink and/or look away is quick enough that... show more
    Unfortunately, many lasers (most not made in America, which is most of them, especially the cheaper ones like what would be used on a tour) have a higher output than they say. Still, red lasers, which I'm assuming this is, rarely cause injuries from accidental brief exposure, because the reflex to blink and/or look away is quick enough that there's not enough time for damage to occur. Even if damage did occur, it would only really matter if it happened to the macula, which could cause you to lose vision. Obviously that didn't happen otherwise the doctor would be wondering why you weren't seeing clearly, and would check the maculae and see the damage. Long story short, you're fine. Though I would definitely have said something to the tour people about letting a 10 year old have a laser pointer. Of course, I'm curious why, if you were worried about it, you didn't mention it to your doctor.
    5 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • What is wrong with my vision ?

    This is because the center of your retina is packed densely with cone cells, which are designed for lighted conditions and allow you to see color and provide higher resolution, whereas the retina outside this area has rod cells, which don't see color and are low resolution but do much better in low light. So when you're seeing something out... show more
    This is because the center of your retina is packed densely with cone cells, which are designed for lighted conditions and allow you to see color and provide higher resolution, whereas the retina outside this area has rod cells, which don't see color and are low resolution but do much better in low light. So when you're seeing something out of the corner of your eye, you're using the rods, then when you look right at it, you're using cones, which can't see it as well without more light. This is why it's better to look to the side of what you're trying to see when in the dark, as you'll actually see it better.
    3 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • How to stop contact lenses from scratching my eyes?

    Best answer: The ideal way to remove contacts, and what I teach my patients, is to lightly pin the contact down against your eye with the pad of your finger, then look up. By gently pressing it, you will keep it from moving up with your eye, so it will effectively slide down onto the white part (sclera) below the cornea. Then, while keeping your... show more
    Best answer: The ideal way to remove contacts, and what I teach my patients, is to lightly pin the contact down against your eye with the pad of your finger, then look up. By gently pressing it, you will keep it from moving up with your eye, so it will effectively slide down onto the white part (sclera) below the cornea. Then, while keeping your finger on it (if you let go it will slide back over the cornea), pinch it off like you normally do. This way, if you scratch the eye, you'll only be scratching the conjunctiva, which isn't a big deal. Plus, it's tougher than the cornea, so it won't scratch as easily.
    5 answers · Optical · 6 years ago
  • Contact lens use after keratitis?

    Best answer: Just because you think it's better doesn't mean it's completely healed, and even if it is wearing the contacts is what did this in the first place, so you need to give your eyes a break. Additionally, depending on the drops you're on, there's a good chance you shouldn't use them with contacts. show more
    Best answer: Just because you think it's better doesn't mean it's completely healed, and even if it is wearing the contacts is what did this in the first place, so you need to give your eyes a break. Additionally, depending on the drops you're on, there's a good chance you shouldn't use them with contacts.
    2 answers · Optical · 6 years ago